UN revives efforts to eliminate yaws – once forgotten disease that is

26 January 2007The United Nations health agency is reviving efforts to eliminate yaws, a nearly forgotten disease that eats away at the skin, cartilage and bones of its victims, mostly children, which is making a comeback after a global control programme almost eradicated it over 40 years ago. The United Nations health agency is reviving efforts to eliminate yaws, a nearly forgotten disease that eats away at the skin, cartilage and bones of its victims, mostly children, which is making a comeback after a global control programme almost eradicated it over 40 years ago. “The persistence of yaws in the 21st century is unacceptable,” UN World Health Organization (WHO) Director of Neglected Tropical Diseases Lorenzo Savioli said of the disease which is re-emerging in poor, rural and marginalized populations of Africa, Asia and South America. “There is a cost-effective approach to treating this disease,” he added, noting that the single dose of long-acting penicillin costs as little as $0.32. Experts believe that yaws can be eliminated and eventually eradicated because humans are the only reservoir of infection. New cases appear every year. This week, world experts including officials from the health ministries of selected endemic countries – Indonesia, Ghana and the Republic of Congo – are holding informal talks to develop a new global strategy for combating it. The overall aim is to minimize suffering and the socio-economic impact the disease has on affected populations. A recent control programme in India provides optimism that elimination can be achieved in other countries with persistent efforts and political commitment. In the south-east Asia region, the aim is to eradicate yaws by 2012. This week’s talks are examining whether elimination is now possible in other regions of the world, signalling a possible revival of the 1950s global yaws programme as well as the development of a current global strategy to generate much-needed support at global, regional and country levels to eradicate it once and for all. The officials are studying a three-fold strategy: detecting and treating all yaws cases and their contacts; interrupting transmission; and preventing disability. read more

Deputy SecretaryGeneral hails exhibition celebrating work of UN Population Fund

“The photos in ‘Family of Woman’ speak more eloquently than I ever could about the – literally – vital work of the United Nations Population Fund around the world,” Ms. Fréchette told participants, voicing hope that “as this exhibition makes its way around the United States, that message will resound loud and clear among all those who come to see it.”In July, the United States Government decided not to grant the agency $34 million that had been appropriated by Congress – a move which UNFPA warned would cost thousands of women and children their lives.In her remarks, the Deputy Secretary-General underscored the importance of UNFPA’s mission to ensure “that every child is a wanted child, that every pregnancy and birth is healthy, that every woman and young person can remain HIV-free, that the rights and freedoms of every girl and woman are respected, and that every family has the hope of a strong and stable future.”Ms. Fréchette also praised the partnership between the agency and the US Committee for the United Nations Population Fund, which produced the exhibit, saying it was an example of the kind of collaboration needed to meet the Millennium Development Goals set by world leaders attending a UN Summit in New York in 2000. read more

Supreme Court confirms legal victory by Dunkin Donuts Quebec franchisees

by The Canadian Press Posted Mar 17, 2016 11:16 am MDT Last Updated Mar 17, 2016 at 1:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email OTTAWA – Former franchisees that ran coffee shops under the Dunkin’ Donuts banner in Quebec have won a 13-year battle against the parent company.The Supreme Court of Canada on Thursday dismissed a request to hear an appeal of a Quebec Court of Appeal decision last year.The ruling forces Dunkin’ Brands Canada Ltd. to pay the 21 former operators of 32 locations in the province nearly $18 million, including interest and legal costs.The former franchisees sued the company in 2003 for failing to live up to its obligation to promote the U.S. donut chain’s brand in Quebec as it faced growing competition from Tim Hortons.The company had alleged that the franchisees didn’t manage the brand according to its standards.In 2012, the Quebec Superior Court ruled in favour of the franchisees, cancelled their leases and contracts, and ordered Dunkin’ Donuts to pay $16.4 million in damages.Three years later, the Court of Appeal unanimously upheld the ruling but reduced the award to $10.9 million.Only four Dunkin’ Donuts locations remain in Quebec, all in the Montreal area. Supreme Court confirms legal victory by Dunkin’ Donuts Quebec franchisees read more