DEA Receives US$80K Donations

first_imgUnited Nations Offices on Drugs and Crimes (NODC) yesterday handed over to authorities at the Liberia Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), two brand new Toyota pickups and other equipment valued at US$80,000.This is one of the UN agencies leading the fight against illicit drugs and international crime, with the mandate to assist member states in their struggle against illicit drugs, crime and terrorism.  NODC is leading the effort jointly with our international partners, notably the United States of America State Department and their Embassy accredited near this capital with significant contribution of funds.The UNODC affirmed its commitment to enhance the law enforcement agencies of Liberia such as DEA and the Trans International Crime Unit (TCU) to be efficient, solid and reliable antinarcotics or organized crime agencies.The donation includes computer lab training equipment as well as uniforms and other crime fighting resources.The UNODC Representative to Liberia, Jesus Agvilar Cereno, in his presentation statement said, the vehicles and other equipment donated to the DEA signify a strong dedication and collective commitment to building a modern, efficient internal security and criminal investigation system.The equipment and the vehicles are to further empower the DEA to cope with challenges of transnational crime, organized crime, drugs trafficking that are taking advantage of the country’s vulnerabilities, which can undermine the country’s stability and development efforts.“With capable human resources and adequate equipment DEA is prepared to address the challenges of organized crime and drug trafficking in the Liberian society, in collaboration with other societies in the region in matters related to transnational crime,” Mr. Cereno stated.According to him, transnational organized crime is a global threat, “since organized crimes take roots to destabilize countries and whole regions.”However, he said, the threat that transnational` organized crime, notable drug trafficking in the country and the region can be mitigate by making additional efforts towards strengthening law enforcement agencies.Meanwhile, UNODC has reiterated its commitment to continue the enhancing and modernization of law enforcement agencies in the country.In his response, DEA Director, Anthony K. Souh, expressed gratitude on behalf of the staff and officers of the agency for the donations.“With open hands and hearts, we are glad to receive these materials because they are coming at a time when we need them the most,” Director Souh declared.Earlier, Mr. Cereno presented keys of the vehicles to the Assistant Justice Minister for Administration, Wheatonia Dixon Barnes, who in turned presented them to the DEA Director. She however warned that the items and vehicles presented should be used for their intended purposes.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img

Who Controls US$100K CU Subsidy from GOL?

first_imgThe administration of Cuttington University in Suakoko District, Bong County has clarified for the first time that it does not have control over a US$100,000 subsidy from the Government of Liberia (GOL).The clarification comes in the wake of a recent letter to the CU administration from Rivercess County Education Officer, and also a former lawmaker of Bong County, Samuel Bondo seeking explanation on the usage of the US$100,000 allotted by the government under the category, “Local Scholarships at Cuttington.”The University’s director of public relations, Prince V. Sampson, disclosed that the amount in question is being expended by Rep. Edward Karfiah through the Neyongor Welekelen Scholarship Scheme and Senator Jewel Howard Taylor through the Land Grant Scholarship, respectively.Mr. Sampson said at a news conference that the money is a CU subsidy, and that the administration has been instructed by the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning (MFDP) to direct the money to the legislative programs of the two lawmakers.“We don’t have absolute control over this particular money and we don’t know how it is being expended. There is no written document from either of these lawmakers acknowledging us on the usage of the money despite being a CU subsidy,” Mr. Sampson said.The CU public relations director explained that the administration of Cuttington through its president, Dr. Evelyn Kandakai, during the last fiscal year wrote the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning requesting MFDP to detach the US$100,000 from the CU subsidy on grounds that the university has no authority over the usage of the money.“These are things that can embarrass us in our report especially when auditors come to audit government funds sent to the institution. If these lawmakers were giving us reports, we could attach their reports to ours and provide it to the government,” Mr. Sampson explained.Rivercess County education officer Samuel Bondo on February 8 addressed a letter to CU President Dr. Kandakai seeking an explanation on how the money was being managed and who were the direct beneficiaries of the scholarship.In the 2012/2013 budget year, Cuttington received US$1 million from government as a subsidy. The subsidy amount has been drastically reduced to less than half of the US$1 million.In an interview with a local radio station in Gbarnga over the weekend, the political affairs officer in the office of Senator Jewel Howard Taylor, Josiah Marvin Cole, said at no time did the Land Grant Scholarship place the money as part of Cuttington University’s subsidy.Mr. Cole explained that the Land Grant Scholarship has budgetary allotment in the National Budget, but not under Cuttington, as claimed by the CU administration, and challenged the University to provide documents to support the claim.When contacted for comment on the issue, the office of Rep. Edward Karfiah said it will comment on the situation at the appropriate time. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more