PEANUT Rx App

first_imgA new smartphone app for the Peanut Disease Risk Index, or “PEANUT Rx,” will help Georgia peanut growers predict their risk of disease for this year’s crop.The PEANUT Rx program, created by researchers from the University of Georgia, University of Florida, Auburn University and Mississippi State University, allows producers to predict the advantages of using various crop management strategies. Growers can now access this information in the field, on the tractor or in their truck, thanks to the new app.“I’m not here to tell a grower what to do. Our role in University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is to give farmers options, give them opportunities,” said Bob Kemerait, plant pathologist on the UGA Tifton Campus. “The opportunity that this app provides is (for growers) to educate themselves on what their risk is, to manage that risk and then to understand the prescription fungicide programs that different companies offer, spraying fewer times or more times, depending on (whether they’re at a) low risk or high risk. Even if they don’t change their fungicide program, it’s an opportunity to learn how to reduce risk and how to properly manage risk.”The PEANUT Rx app can be accessed from smartphones with Apple or Android operating systems. Those with a Android operating system can go to Google Play and search “UGA PEANUT Rx.” Growers using iPhones should go to the Apple App Store and search “PEANUT Rx.” The app is free and only takes a few minutes to download. Risk factors are updated annually, providing growers with the most updated information relating to research and variety testing, Kemerait said.“There are countless hours and years of research in this PEANUT Rx project. The beauty of it is its simplicity. We are able to package many of the things we understand about disease risk in peanuts into a few simple steps,” Kemerait said. “It’s now even more available through a smartphone app. We’re hopeful growers will adopt it and be comfortable with it, in order to better manage their peanuts.”PEANUT Rx deals with the three major diseases in peanuts: tomato spotted wilt virus, leaf spot and white mold. Kemerait said the index examines production factors like crop rotation, planting dates, plant varieties and the insecticide growers use at the beginning of the growing season. The index provides producers with a risk assessment of crops that could be affected by one of these three diseases.“It helps our farmers tailor a program that’s most appropriate for their risks. We’re not waiting until we see disease; we’re looking at the preseason risk factors that are associated with outbreaks of the disease and then changing those factors – finding a different variety, adjusting planting date, plant population, tillage practices – that will affect risks. Once you have a final risk value, then you decided what fungicide program is most appropriate for your situation,” Kemerait said.To learn more about PEANUT Rx, go to ugapeanuts.com. If you have additional questions, contact your local UGA Extension agent.Georgia is the country’s top producer of peanuts, recording $507.4 million in farm gate value in 2013, according to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development.last_img read more

Amazing transformation: This is what a home renovation that took 37 years looks like

first_imgRestumping and laying the cement slab during the renovation of 64 Philip St, Hawthorne. Pic supplied. The major renovation happened in 2004, when the kitchen was converted into the main bedroom, a new kitchen was created as part of a back extension and a large, back deck added on.“That was the most exciting thing because we weren’t doing it ourselves,” Mrs Roebig said.“To see some professionals come in and renovate was just awesome!” The master bedroom in the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.This leads to the living and dining area, which is an open-plan space backing on to a wide-set deck.The new kitchen comes with a double sink, rangehood, gas cooking, dishwasher and island bar topped with white stone. The hallway in the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.The Roebigs have decided it’s time for a tree change, and another — less intensive — renovation project now awaits them in Boonah.“It’s a very hard decision to leave,” Mrs Roebig said.“The house has been such a big part of our life, and for all of our family, no matter how horrible it was.” The front of the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, before it was renovated. Pic supplied. “That’s been our family joke.“If only dad was around to see it now!” The front veranda of the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.The downstairs living room comes with its own kitchenette, patio and bathroom — doubling as a guest or teenage retreat. Other features include polished timber floors, high pressed metal ceilings and wide archways. The kitchen in the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, before it was renovated. Pic supplied. The back of the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.Gradually, over the years, the renovation process became more involved.The house was restumped and re-roofed and a concrete slab laid downstairs to create two levels.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours ago“We dug out instead of raising the house because of the fireplace,” Mrs Roebig said.“We weren’t game to touch it.” MORE: Historic home set for hammer Inside the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.The property is for sale through Shannon Harvey of Place – Bulimba.RENO FACT CHECKTime taken: 4 years for major reno plus bits and pieces over 33 yearsTotal spend: Over $1mEnd valuation: $1.5m – $2m The backyard at the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.The end result is a four-bedroom, three-bathroom classic beauty with city views.As you enter the house, a formal lounge awaits, featuring one side of an original double-sided fireplace, with the other side in the master bedroom. Terry and Helen Roebig at the house they have spent 37 years renovating. Picture: Peter Wallis.HER father told her to burn the house rather than buy it, but Helen Roebig still thinks it’s the best $30,000 she ever spent.It was 1981 and high school sweethearts, Helen and her husband, Terry, were newly married and hunting for their first home when a rundown, two-bedroom cottage at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne became available.“My dad said; ‘Oh love, yes, buy it and put a match to it, will you?” Mrs Roebig said. RELATED: Reno magic – Manhattan in Ascot The front of the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.Built around 1910, the original house was in bad shape when the Roebigs bought it.“We had friends who were renting the house and we used to go there for dinner and sit around the fire,” Mrs Roebig said.”One day they said the house was up for sale through a deceased estate and I said we wanted an old Queenslander.“It had such an ugly facade, but when I went inside to the heart of the place and saw the veranda, then I could just see it.“It all became a picture for me and all that ugliness was just superficial, so we went ahead and bought the house for $30,000.” The front of the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.Mrs Roebig said her husband worked seven days a week, so they would work on the house together at night.“We filled a tip truck three times on the first weekend,” she said.“I started taking skirting board off the walls and I’d find there was VJ panelling underneath. so I’d take a piece off and that night, my husband would come home and take more off and there would be a big pile of it in the morning.“They’d cladded over everything — it was horrible.”Everything was painted in Mission Brown, which was the colour of choice in the 1970s and 1980s. The view from the deck of the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated.Two of the four bedrooms have direct access to bathrooms and walk-in robes, while a fifth room can double as a study or guest stay. Downstairs, there’s a rumpus room, a work shop, a home business, a storage space and a separate living area. The kitchen and dining area of the house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, after it was renovated. The kitchen and dining area after it was renovated.In recent years, they connected the downstairs level with the upstairs by installing internal stairs and put in a new front veranda.“We’ve been renovating for 37 years, bit by bit, because we’ve done most of it ourselves,” Mrs Roebig said. The house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, before it was renovated. Pic supplied. The house at 64 Philip St, Hawthorne, before it was renovated. Pic supplied.last_img read more

Landlords set to win as vacancy rates tighten across QLD

first_img MORE: Welcome to QLD’s power streets LGA Mar-20 Jun-20 Australia’s most wanted streets revealed AFL star Jason Akermanis hopes to kick goals selling real estate The Veronicas selling their QLD hinterland hideaway REIQ head Antonia Mercorella said Queensland had a very high rental population at present (about 35 per cent), exacerbated by COVID-19. As interstate migration grows post the pandemic, Ms Mercorella said she expected rental demand to rise further. Regional areas are experiencing rent rises for the first time in years. Four-bedroom 18 Macquarie Street, Jensen, is for rent for $800 a week through Explore Property.“When you think about how Queensland has fared and how much more affordable it is over Sydney and Melbourne, I think we are going to see more people, particularly from southern states, move here. There’s greater affordability, terrific liveability, demand will rise in the post COVID world.”She said the tighter vacancy rates demonstrated the cyclical nature of the market.“It was not that long ago that I was talking about very weak vacancy rates and weak demand and yet here we are, not long after, looking at a different picture.”She said it was pleasing for landlords who have had to drop their rental asking prices in the past few years. “It’s nice to see that those landlords are perhaps being rewarded. When you are in an area where vacancy rates are tight, it does mean competitive, limited supply and therefore higher rents and the chances of negotiating rent reductions are reduced.“Most of Queensland is classified as tight now,” she said. “It definitely is more advantageous for the owner.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58center_img Greater Brisbane 2.0% 2.0%Brisbane LGA 2.1% 3.2% Inner (0-5km) 2.7% 3.9% Middle (5-20km) 1.8% 2.4% Outer Brisbane² 1.8% 1.7% Ipswich 2.0% 1.9% Logan 2.0% 2.2% Moreton Bay 1.7% 1.4% More from newsCOVID-19 renovation boom: How much Aussies are spending to give their houses a facelift during the pandemic3 days agoWhizzkid buys almost one property a month during COVID-197 days agoCaboolture 0.8% 1.2% Pine Rivers 2.0% 1.7% Redcliffe 2.0% 1.6% Redland 1.5% 1.3% Mainland 0.9% 1.7% Bay Islands 4.3% 1.2% Gold Coast 3.0% 3.0% Sunshine Coast SD 1.8% 2.0% Sunshine Coast^ 1.4% 1.9% Caloundra Coast 1.0% 1.4% Maroochy Coast 1.4% 2.1% Hinterland^ 1.5% 2.1% Noosa^ 3.6% 2.4% Fraser Coast 3.1% 1.2% Hervey Bay 4.3% 1.6% Maryborough 1.2% 0.4% Cairns 3.5% 2.4% Source: REIQ Among the patterns that have emerged through COVID-19 is an increase in fly-in fly-out workers staying in regional cities to maintain jobs, and families moving to be closer together. Ms Mercorella said there was a need for greater rental supply.“So many renters do rely on private owners, and mum and dad investors to provide rental accommodation for them. It demonstrates a need to meet rental demand.”One area where tenants have maintained the upper hand is in Brisbane’s inner ring, within 5km of the CBD, where the vacancy rate is comparatively weak at 3.9 per cent.In those areas rents could get cheaper, according to Ms Mercorella, giving tenants the opportunity to lock-in good rates longer term.“Certainly in those areas there is more availability,” she said. This is down to a higher level of apartments in those locations but also the fact that a lot of stock that was originally short-term holiday rentals have come into the long-term market. “Because of COVID-19 and the inability of people to travel, some owners have decided to transfer from short-term lets to the long-term market. Then there are properties vacant because of students going back home to live with mum and dad and universities going online.” Residential vacancy rates: 2209/25 Anderson Street, Kangaroo Point, is up for rent at $425 a week.Landlords who stuck it out through Queensland’s latest period of rental oversupply are set to win after vacancy rates tighten across the state, sparking rent rises.Figures released by the Real Estate Institute of Queensland (REIQ) show that the majority of the state is sitting on tight vacancy rates, with regional cities experiencing the first rent rises in years. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more