Courtois given all clear to return

first_img Courtois played on after requiring treatment for a head knock following a first-half collision with Arsenal forward Alexis Sanchez, before being replaced after further treatment and departing Stamford Bridge for precautionary scans in hospital. A Chelsea statement issued on Monday read: “Chelsea Football Club can confirm Thibaut Courtois went to hospital during our Premier League game against Arsenal yesterday (Sunday) for precautionary tests on a head injury. Those tests came back all clear. “Thibaut was treated for a minor cut to his ear and was released from hospital last night. He is expected to report for international duty (with Belgium) later this week.” Headway, the brain injury charity, has questioned the application of the Premier League’s regulations following the decision to allow Courtois to play on. The Premier League is understood to be happy the rules were correctly applied. Headway chief executive Peter McCabe said on the charity’s website: “The new rules introduced this season were designed to ensure no risks to players’ health were taken. “They clearly state that ‘If there is any suspicion of the player having sustained a concussion, they must be removed from the field of play, and not allowed to return.’ “This incident calls into question whether these rules are working effectively. “It is hard to understand how a concussion was not suspected following the sickening clash.” Courtois was taken off only after liquid appeared to be coming from his ear. McCabe acknowledged the difficulty of making an assessment from television, but questioned why a “safety-first approach” was not applied. He added: “Bleeding from one or both ears is one of the symptoms to look out for that requires an immediate visit or return to hospital following a head injury. “The fact that the bleeding only became apparent 15 minutes after the injury also demonstrates the evolving nature of concussion and highlights why a safety-first approach must be taken with all head injuries.” Chelsea’s first-team squad were afforded a day off by manager Jose Mourinho on Monday as many of the players prepared to join up with their national teams after the Blues extended their advantage at the top of the Premier League to five points from Manchester City. Only goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer, defender John Terry and striker Didier Drogba, who is currently nursing an ankle injury, will stay behind for training, with all three having retired from international duty. Eden Hazard leaves for Belgium duty, alongside Courtois, on a high after a mixed start to the season. The playmaker, who is expected to sign a new contract shortly to commit to Chelsea, was below par against Aston Villa, but sparkled on occasion against the Gunners, particularly in the run which led to the penalty which he converted himself. Hazard, who was the target of some heavy tackling in the contest, is content to be fouled if it benefits the team. And he believes with Cesc Fabregas over a set-piece, a goal is always possible. “When I get the ball I need to go forward and win free-kicks, win penalties,” the 23-year-old Hazard told Chelsea TV. “If they want to play like this it’s not my problem. They have two against me, okay, but I can create a lot of space for other players. “We can score every game with Fabregas from a free-kick or corner.” Chelsea have dropped two points in their opening seven games – in drawing at Manchester City – and are top of their Champions League Group. Hazard knows there is no margin for error, though. He added: “We have a strong team. We need to concentrate all the time, 100 per cent. “We know we have bad moments in one season, but we need to be focused all the time.” Chelsea goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois has been cleared to play on after undergoing precautionary tests following the head injury he sustained during Sunday’s 2-0 Premier League win over Arsenal. Press Associationlast_img read more

USC’s SCholars program facing a hazy future

first_imgSenior Stephanie Garcia is the first in her family to attend college. She began at Los Angeles Community College, and transferred to USC in her sophomore year with the help of the SCholars program — a program that helps first-generation and low-income students transfer to four-year universities.Since coming to USC, Garcia has been actively involved with the SCholars program, even bringing her younger sister to events with her. She hopes the events will eventually inspire her sister to attend a four-year school.SCholarly · Juana Escobar, a junior majoring in communication, transferred from Los Angeles City College through the SCholars program. – Dieuwertje Kast | Daily TrojanBut unless the program manages to quickly raise hundreds of thousands of dollars, Garcia’s sister might not have the same opportunity.“If I wouldn’t have known and been a part of the SCholars, I would’ve still been struggling,” Garcia said. “They helped with a lot of the challenges we face as transfer students, but also as a lot of first-generation college students. A lot of us did have a hard time transferring, academically and socially, and they’ve definitely been there to help bridge that gap.”The SCholars program was established at USC in 2006, spurred by a grant of almost $1 million. But the money, given by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, was a one-time grant. Now that the funds from the grant have run out, the program’s future is in jeopardy.The program takes about $200,000-$250,000 per year to run, according to Judi Garbuio, associate dean of the Academic Recognition and Scholars Program. The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, in the midst of financial difficulty, has said it will not renew the grant, so the SCholars program is looking for an alternative source of funding.“We’re working on it, trying to seek funds from other foundations, and we’ve also been engaged in fundraising from private parties willing to support the cause,” said K.C. Mmeje, the SCholars program director. “We’re trying to get the university to see that what we’re doing is important enough for them to provide support to sustain the program, but we’re not seeing that right now.”Because the program has been funded entirely by sources outside of USC so far, it is looking to other external sources first. Garbuio said asking USC for funding would be a last resort, because they are aware of the many other programs aiming to get money from the university. She was not optimistic about other sources of funding, either.“It’s a very tough time to be fundraising,” Garbuio said. “Different individuals have suffered with the economy, so they’re not as likely to donate to foundations, which are in turn not as likely to give out grants.”Like Garcia, Roland Zapata, a junior majoring in psychology and a member of the SCholars program, said the program has been a defining part of his educational experience and hopes that it finds a way to stay afloat.“It’s a transition program, essentially, it’s a baby-step thing, perfect for someone like me,” Zapata said. “I was asking all these weird questions and I was getting answers.”The SCholars program offers students counseling resources and group events to help them succeed socially and academically.“Without it, who knows if I would’ve even ended up here,” Zapata said. “People say that as a joke, ‘Who knows where I’d be,’ but really. Even once I got here, it’s been a big jump from community college … Even if I had gotten here without it, without that support to fall back on, I would’ve been like, ‘OK, I’m dropping this, I’m out.’”Cheryl Armstrong, director of the University Transfer Center at Los Angeles City College, said the program is important to students and believes that it should be a priority for it to continue to function.“If I had a pot of money set aside, this would be a priority in terms of making sure this program continues,” she said. “Students who go through this specific program tend to apply to select universities, tend to enroll and complete the work and go on to graduate school. It provides the transition information that students need who might not have succeeded otherwise.”The grant from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation extends through August 2010, so students currently in community colleges entering USC next year will still go through the SCholar program’s summer immersion session.The immersion program, however, will put more emphasis on pointing out resources on campus they can turn to in case the SCholars office is available next fall.Still, Garbuio said she believes in the program.“I’m still hopeful,” she said. “I really believe it’s a fantastic program, and that we’ll figure out a way to keep it going.”last_img read more