Kioxia lance la construction d’une nouvelle installation dans l’usine de Yokkaichi pour appuyer sa…

first_img WhatsApp WhatsApp Local News By Digital AIM Web Support – March 4, 2021 Artist’s impression of Fab 7, Yokkaichi Plant Kioxia lance la construction d’une nouvelle installation dans l’usine de Yokkaichi pour appuyer sa production de mémoires flash 3D de sixième génération Twitter Facebookcenter_img TAGS  Facebook Previous articleMercer looks to sweep SamfordNext articleNewegg Grows Company’s Presence in Southern California with Expansive New 3PL Facility Digital AIM Web Support Pinterest Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

Local Elections 2019 Debates – Glenties MD Debate 2

first_img Google+ Local Elections 2019 Debates – Glenties MD Debate 2 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Homepage BannerNewsx Highland Radio Local Election 2019 Debates Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Previous articleMan sustains head & facial injuries during ‘violent assault’ in CarndonaghNext articleLocal Elections 2019 Debates – Glenties MD Debate 1 admin WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp By admin – May 21, 2019 Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic The people go to the polls on May 24th to elect a new Donegal County Council.Between now and then we will host a series of debates concentrating on each of the 6 districts in the Highland Radio Franchise area.In the fourth of our election debates, we focused on the Glenties Municipal District where 13 candidates are vying for 6 seats.In part two of a two part debate we were joined by:Cllr Enda Bonner (Fianna Fail), Brian Carr (Sinn Fein),Cllr Micheal Cholm Mac Giolla Easbuig (independent), Anthony Molloy (Fianna Fail), Seamus Rodgers (Labour) and Cllr John Sheamuis O Fearraigh (Sinn Fein). An invitation extended to Fine Gael’s Evelyn Sweeney was declined.Click to listen:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/GlentiesDebate2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

JULY 2018 BIRTHDAYS

first_imgHADLIE DARKE-SCHRIEBERRON COSBYJOE WALLACECONNIE ROBINSONKACY DARKERON GEARYGINA GIBSONJEAN BLANTONBARB WOODRUFFCLINT KELLERWILLIAM WASHBURNCLINT KELLERDAWN CIMELEYANDREW LOBACZJEAN BLANTONRANDY DILLBACKKAREN WARPENBURNTINA DENSLEYMARK MILLERKELLY HENNINGDEBBIE ALBINJENNIE BAILEYKELLY DOCKERYBOB FITZSIMMONSFRANK ENDRESDEBORAH LEWISKATHY WILSONFRANK ENDRESRICK SELLERSPENNY JOHNFRANK ENDRESDEBORAH LEWISBOB FITZSIMMONSKATHY WILSONMARK HARMONGREG SCHULTENCHRISTINA NUNLEYBRIAN VAALCHARLES HODGESDOUG CLAYBOURNJAMIE BREMERCAND COOPERELLADA HADJISAVVAJUDE MCCORD JULIE KARGERKEN HAYNIE REBECCA WEDDLEAMY WORD-SMITHJULIE BEERYELLADA HADJISAVVABRIAN VAALJEFFREY BURGERDAVID HERRENRUCK CANDY COOPERFOOTNOTE:  IF YOU HAVE A LOVE ONE OR FRIEND WHO HAS A BIRTHDAY IN THE MONTH OF JULY PLEASE SEND THEIR NAMES TO THE CITY-COUNTY OBSERVER.COM AND WE SHALL POST THEM FOR YOU AT NO COST.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist discusses relationship between religion, China

first_imgIan Johnson, 2001 Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, discussed the role of religion in Chinese society during his lecture titled “Religion in China: Back to the Center of Politics and Society.” The event was sponsored by the McGrath Institute for Church Life and the US-China Catholic Association and took place in the Eck Visitors Center Auditorium on Monday.Johnson moved to Beijing in 2009 and has lived there since, working for publications such as The New York Times and The New York Review of Books, as well as for the Beijing Center for Chinese Studies. His most recent book, “The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao,” was released in 2017 and discusses these issues.Johnson began his discussion with a historical background of China’s relationship with religion during the late 19th century reform movements.“This was pretty much a top-down enterprise driven by elites in China who felt that their country was losing ground to the West — that there was something wrong with Chinese culture, especially with Chinese religion,” Johnson said.He described this general trend of governmental distaste for religion as continuing into the 20th century communism under Mao; however, he cited a recent modern shift in government view of religion from avoidance to acceptance of traditional Chinese religious practices.“I think the government’s policy, broadly speaking — and there are exceptions to all of this — is support of some religions and suspicion to downright hostility toward other religions,” Johnson said. “The religions that are supported are the traditional religions.”Johnson described the government’s renewed interest and support of traditional cultural religions through propaganda and UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage projects.“[The Chinese Government] redefined folk religious practice as intangible cultural heritage,” Johnson said. “Not all of intangible cultural heritage is religious but a fair amount of it is.”Johnson discussed the large implications of such cultural heritage projects for acceptance of previously scorned traditional religions.“[These religions] are no longer declared superstitious,” Johnson said. “They have the benefit of government support … it is that government support that matters and gives prestige. They are no longer looked down upon.”Johnson then discussed religions facing persecution in China — particularly Christianity and Islam — which he referred to as the “foreign faiths.” He presented the audience with images of crosses on buildings being removed, video surveillance of religious sites and government-run re-education camps for Muslims living in China.However, Johnson asserted that many ordinary religious practices, particularly related to Christianity, are still carried out throughout the country.“There are real problems going on, but there is also a lot of normal religious life that goes on despite the problems,” he said. “Not to try to whitewash it or sugarcoat it, but I think it is important to remember in a big country like China, when we are talking about religions with millions and tens of millions of numbers, it’s not as if everybody is under pressure.”Despite the continuing persecution of religious groups in China, Johnson expressed optimism regarding the recent increase of religious practice in the country.“What I find more interesting is that religion, from being a marginalized part of Chinese society, is back in the center,” he said. “It is back in the center in a good way — people search for values and search for meaning in life, things that are important issues in our own society — but also in the nitty gritty political world as well.”Tags: China, McGrath Institute for Church Life, religion, US-China Catholic Associationlast_img read more