Dearborn Co. Young Professionals Present Scholarships

first_imgLawrenceburg’s Abbigail Sampson was awarded the scholarship during her graduation party. (Image courtesy: AIM Young Professionals)Three recent graduates from Dearborn County are receiving college assistance from the AIM Young Professionals of Dearborn County.Lawrenceburg High School senior Abbigail Sampson and South Dearborn High School’s Kaleb Barrows were each awarded $500 to aid in financing their college education.The students were chosen from among several qualified candidates in earning AIM YP Future Leaders of Dearborn County Scholarships.“This is the best graduation gift, I am so surprised!” Sampson said during a surprise awarding of the scholarship check by AIM YP President Hollie Stoops at her graduation party.Along with outstanding grades, Sampson’s high school activities helping her earn the scholarship included four years on the LHS Academic Team, Students Against Substance Abuse, Student Council, and volunteering with Big Brothers Big Sisters.AIM YP’s board selected Barrows because of his enthusiasm in the classroom, volunteering, in athletics, and working with his hands. In his essay, the future Xavier University student wrote that he plans to become a dentist and establish an office in Dearborn County.“I have had a goal from a very young age that I want to own my own business,” Barrows stated.“As I have grown older I have evolved that dream into the idea of owning my own dental practice. I feel owning a practice in the Dearborn County area would not only benefit me, but others as well. I have always felt the desire to give back to others with hard work and dedication and believe this would be the chance for me to do that.”Barrows has volunteered numerous hours with the Hope Baptist Church Worship Band, Ripley Creek hunting Association, ORSANCO River Sweep, and other causes. During the summer break before college, Barrows said he plans to try his hand at building pergolas and gazebos.Additionally, South Dearborn senior Andrew Bruner was awarded the $250 Young Professionals Scholarship through South Dearborn Dollars for Scholars. He received the scholarship at Dollars for Scholars’ awards ceremony held at Dearborn Country Club on June 5.Bruner is a four-year member of the South Dearborn cross country team and math academic team, as well as an inductee into the National Honor Society. With the help of the Dollars for Scholars Young Professionals Scholarship, he plans to attend Mount St. Joseph University in the fall.The annual scholarships are funded through sponsorships for the AIM YP 5K Run/Walk presented by Walmart and Top Quality Building Products held each spring and annual membership dues.Each scholarship applicant was required to be a student at any of Dearborn County’s three high schools or residing in Dearborn County.In May, South Dearborn senior Crystal Nichols was named the 2014 Dearborn County Maverick Challenge Champion and won $3,000 at the local and regional competition levels. Classmates Andrew Wildridge and Kerry Raab shared a $500 prize as the local runner-up team.AIM YP plans to offer the AIM YP Future Leaders of Dearborn County Scholarships and the Maverick Challenge again in 2015 to students at East Central, Lawrenceburg, and South Dearborn high schools.Interested students and parents can learn more by visiting here >>last_img read more

Garoppolo not only injury concern as 49ers get back to work

first_imgSANTA CLARA – Health care is topic No. 1 at the 49ers. Their offseason program gets underway Monday, limited the first two weeks to strength and conditioning as well as rehabilitation of injured players.Here are those coming off 2018 medical concerns:QB Jimmy Garoppolo (left knee): All reports have been positive in the six months since surgery to replace his anterior cruciate ligament. He’s expected to throw once 7-on-7 … Click here if you’re unable to view the gallery on your mobile device.last_img

Endless mowing

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I recently made a significant reduction in livestock numbers at our place. I was having trouble justifying the expense and the work required to care for so many critters so I decided it was time to make a change. The change wasn’t an easy one, but it has significantly lightened my livestock related workload and expenses.The one side affect to reduced livestock numbers that I had not foreseen was the reduction in grass eating power now residing in our barn. With less critters, I buy less feed, but I also have less natural grass mowers. This spring I have spent a lot of time mowing grass.I will admit that I might be overdoing it a little bit with the regularity of my mowing, but shorter grass is easier and faster to cut through and our rotary cutter has been in need of repair for some time. The lack of a usable larger field mower means that this spring I have spent much time seated on a riding mower while mowing not only the yard but the small field beside our house that used double as a pasture and arena but is now just an arena. By the time, I finish mowing, it seems like it is time to start over on another section of grass again.This seemingly endless mowing does become tiresome at times, but at least the weather is nice, and with less livestock to feed next winter, I won’t be worried about running out of hay when the snow is flying. I’ll take an extra ride or two on a riding mower any day to ward off the winter fears of running out of hay.I’m sure I’m not the only one feeling the pressure of endless mowing this time of year.last_img read more

April Caregiving Webinar: Understanding Narcotic Medications for Service Members

first_imgJoin the Military Caregiving Concentration for a FREE monthly professional development webinar on, ‘Understanding Narcotic Medications for Service Members.’Date: Thursday, April 9, 2015Time: 11:00 a.m. EasternEvent location: Understanding Narcotic Medications for Service Members*No registration is required.Narcotic medications are used for a variety of treatments such as, pain management, anxiety, and sleep disorders. Narcotic prescriptions may be given to augment and extend the effects of medications for service members with acute and chronic pain.Within the presentation, participants will be able to:Understand the role that professionals play in medication management for service members.Identify various classes of narcotics, their actions and potential dependence it may cause for wounded warriors.Highlight differences in the therapies for acute and chronic pain management, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).PresentersThe April caregiving webinar will feature two presenters from West Texas A&M University (WTAMU), Kristen Kuhlmann, Ph.D., and Nancy Turrubiates, MSN, RN.Dr. Kuhlmann is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at WTAMU with a research interest in exploring what motivates people to begin or maintain a healthy lifestyle, in order to reduce chronic health problems. Nancy Turrubiates is an Instructor of Nursing at WTAMU and is also a direct commissioned officer in the U.S. Army Reserves and was promoted to Captain (CPT) in 2011. Turrubiates currently teaches in the Bachelor of Science Nursing program at WTAMU to senior level students in community health courses.CEU Credit Available!The Military Families Learning Network will be providing 1.0 National Association of Social Workers (NASW) continuing education credit to credentialed participants. Certificates of Completion will also be available for training hours as well. For more information on CEU credits, see NASW Continuing Education Instructions. Interested in Joining the Webinar?*No registration is required; simply go to, Understanding Narcotic Medication for Service Members, the day of the event to join. The webinar is hosted by the Department of Defense so you must install security certificates if you are not located on a military installation. Instructions for certificate installation can be found by clicking on DCO Adobe Certificate Installation. You can connect to the Adobe webinar using iPhone, iPad, and Droid apps. Search for DCO Connect in the respective stores.For those who cannot connect to the Adobe site, an alternative viewing of this presentation will be running on Ustream.This post written by Mikala Whitaker of the MFLN Military Caregiving concentration team and was published on the Military Families Learning Network blog on March 17, 2015.last_img read more

Filmmaking Tips: David Lowery on Editing and His Daily Routine

first_imgPete’s Dragon and A Ghost Story filmmaker David Lowery shares his daily routine and creative process in this throwback video.To say Lowery is poised for a big year is an understatement. After his recent jump from his indie breakout Ain’t Them Bodies Saints to his first big budget foray with Disney on Pete’s Dragon (which proved to be both critically acclaimed and a box office surprise), Lowery has two highly anticipated films on the slate.His latest indie feature reunites Lowery with stars Rooney Mara and Oscar winner, Casey Affleck. A Ghost Story was an audience favorite at Sundance before being picked up by the Oscar-winning studio A24 (which won for Moonlight).Lowery is also already on set filming his follow up to Pete’s Dragon: the highly anticipated live-action installment of the Peter Pan franchise for Disney. With both projects coming so quickly after each other, one wonders how the writer/director has the time in the day to get so much done.Let’s look at a recently resurfaced video Lowery created for Fortnight Journal back in 2012 to explore the daily routine of a highly productive filmmaker for insight and inspiration.David Lowery’s Daily RoutineLike most filmmakers, even while he was working on his Sundance feature, Lowery had to find ways to balance writing, production meetings, and freelance editing work to make ends meet. You can actually read in-depth about Lowery’s journey from a full-time video editor through his recent tribulations on the set of Pete’s Dragon on his blog, which he has been updating consistently since 2004.An Editor’s Mindset on A Ghost StorySince Lowery was originally an editor by trade, the influences of an editor’s mindset influence how he develops motifs and themes across different scenes. While at Sundance, Lowery chatted about his editing workflow and working on his film in the Adobe Creative Cloud:Having worked as an editor for so many years and on so many independent films, it’s really helped me get a head start on the editorial process when I’m writing the scripts. I think a lot about how I’m going to cut from one scene to the next, what those juxtapositions are going to be. Then when I’m on set it definitely helps you figure out, when you’re in a pitch, what you can jettison, what is not essential.You can catch Lowery’s A Ghost Story when it hits theaters July 7th, or check out his feature Pete’s Dragon, which is currently available on Netflix and DVD.What’s your daily filmmaking routine? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

Craft fair to usher in new year

first_imgA fortnight of cultural performances and an event to celebrate Indian art, crafts, and textiles, Dastkari Haat Samiti returns with the much-awaited crafts bazaar of the year. Conceptualised by textile revivalist Jaya Jaitly, the 33rd edition of the Bazaar will open on January 1, 2019, at Dilli Haat, INA, Delhi.The event will also feature workshops and performances by Mushtaq Ahmed, a flute maker from Varanasi; Moorala Marwada, a Sufi folk singer from the Janana village of the Kutch District, Gujarat who will sing the Also Read – Add new books to your shelfpoetry of Kabir, Mirabai, Ravidas and others; and Bhawani Kalindi and his group from Bengal who will perform the exotic tribal martial Chhau dance throughout the tenure of the bazaar. The distinctive line-up of the 15-day event includes craft and skill exchange program with Indonesia, supported by the O/o Development Commissioner Handicrafts, Ministry of Textiles. The workshop will begin from January 2 with Indonesian artisan who excel in doyo fibre craft, pottery, tie, and dye and batik work paired with their Indian counterparts V, Sadanandam and Y Sridhar in fibre weaving, Telangana and AP, Harikishan in Pottery, New Delhi, Sabina Khatoon in Batik, West Bengal, and Abdul Wahab Khatri in tie and dye, Gujarat. The innovative art pieces thus created will be displayed in the last two days. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveEstablished in 1986, Dastkari Haat Samiti helps over 60,000 artisans by organising annual crafts bazaar all over India that provide them with the exposure and bring them into direct contact with the urban customer. Supporting over 350 crafts groups across the 29 Indian states, the organisation believes in helping artisans and their families in every possible way. “Since the inception in 1986, our aim has been to break the barriers between the craftsmen and community by giving them a platform to showcase their craft. Our annual craft bazaar at Dilli Haat brings that authenticity of handloom and handmade products back with traditional weaves, sustainable home decor and so many more crafts from different states of India.”, shares Jaya Jaitly, Founder of Dastkari Haat Samiti. The craft bazaar will feature everything from a wide range of Vankar shawls of Gujarat, Banarasi textiles from Uttar Pradesh, Handloom Fabrics from Bengal, Bandhani from Gujarat, Handwoven Chanderi, Softest of Pashminas, Ajrakh block printing, Kantha embroidery, Pattachitra paintings, Inlay furniture, papier mache, carpets, durries, home decor accessories and organic products.last_img read more

Is DaaS the New Information Goldmine

first_img By Dyan MachanSuppose you could find all the socks you ever lost. Now suppose getting those socks back enabled you to earn a better living, or work faster and smarter. Wouldn’t you be willing to pay someone to locate those socks on a worldwide sock exchange? That’s the crux of a business category that some entrepreneurs and investors find pregnant with opportunity. “We think this is the next hot thing,” says Jeanne Sullivan, an executive at StarVest Partners, a New York venture-capital firm developing a specialty in this area. The Information Edge “Data as a Service:”Businesses in this field gather specialized information, then organize it in a database for which users pay for access.The Price of Technology:Gathering the information isn’t expensive, but organizing and storing it can be; start-ups can spend millions on computer servers and a web presence.Shoestring Staff:Once it’s up and running, a firm can grow without much person power; five or six people can run a nationwide business. Related Links Small Business Success: Luck or Pluck? Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Seeking Alpha–and Users: 6 New Financial Web Sites More From smSmallBiz » December 30, 2009center_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Unfortunately, the business world has given this baby a jargony name: Data as a Service, or its diminutive, DaaS. It rhymes with SaaS, its better-known cousin that stands for Software as a Service. SaaS is the catchall name for on-demand software applications like those on an iPhone. DaaS, in contrast, recognizes that software is becoming a commodity; it’s data mixed with software that’s king.DaaS offers some intriguing possibilities for start-up types–a chance to build a lucrative business that can grow rapidly without needing a big workforce to keep it running. Better still, if you’re the first to build that sock database, you can have a near monopoly. So while start-up costs can be high–think anywhere up to $10 million to set up servers and a slick web presence–profit margins tend to be fat. That’s because the business model involves gathering information that’s relatively inexpensive or even free to the collector, analyzing it and slicing it into easy-to-consume pieces for people who will pay for it again and again. In business-school speak, “it’s monetizing rich data,” says Sullivan. Imagine, for example, being able to search the sock exchange to find socks that match a user’s singleton socks exactly and then to find the buyers nearest to the user who are willing to meet his price.Some established businesses, like the Zagat Survey restaurant guides, already roughly fit the category–Zagat gets consumers to fill out restaurant surveys and organizes them into guides that grow stale and need replacing, like last year’s fashions. Much more DaaS-like, and one-upping them considerably, is OpenTable. The company sells restaurant-reservation software to restaurants and offers diners online reservations and the ability to search restaurants by geography, cuisine and price; its recent IPO was seen as one of the brighter moments in the postcrash economy. The datacentric companies are among the fastest-growing these days, according to Louise Garnett, an analyst with information research firm Outsell: “I see two to three new ones each week.” Where 1990s-style web businesses often kept the technical and content elements separate, she notes, the growth today comes from companies that can integrate the two. Overall, the information industry grows 5 to 10 percent a year, according to Outsell.Making LemonadeWhat do all these ventures have in common? Lemons. George Akerlof’s lemons, to be precise. In the late 1960s the Nobel Prize-winning University of California, Berkeley, economist sought to answer the age-old question of why buying used cars favored the seller over the buyer. The buyer couldn’t know whether the seller was selling because he needed the cash, or because the junker had unseen repair and maintenance issues. Akerlof proved that the buyer’s inability to discern the difference between a good car and a lemon drove down the prices of all used cars. Buyers don’t like uncertainty, so many would simply walk away from the transaction. Fewer buyers means lower prices–hence the canyon-like price differential between new cars versus those driven even slightly. (And here we thought consumers were willing to pay thousands more for that fresh-car smell.) In financial markets, investors unable to distinguish between a great business and a loser will put their money into cash and leave start-ups without funding. Under Akerlof’s logic, providing more information, with a level playing field for buyer and seller, creates business opportunity.Darwin Melnyk, 45, a former Emory University seminary student, has been striving to do just that. He first entered this field as a modern-day Indiana Jones, working as a technology specialist on archeological digs in the Jordanian desert. In the field, Melnyk figured out how scientists, by inputting data on their laptops, could improve their productivity and speed up the fossilized process of garnering grants. Beginning in 2006 he started to apply those same skills to a different kind of artifact, digging up data about old tractors for farm-equipment dealers. Iron Solutions, of Fenton, Mo., had its genesis in an annually issued guide, akin to the used-car Blue Book, that dates back to the ’40s; dealers would dog-ear the guide to help them price, say, a rusted-out 1992 combine some farmer was offering on a trade. Some of the guide’s information was available online by 1999, but Iron Solutions hadn’t made the digital leap of making it easy to use.Enter Melnyk, who built the old tractor data into a sophisticated database. Want the autumn-harvest price on a tricked-out 2003 Flail chopper? No problem, for an equipment dealer with a $400-a-year subscription to IronSolutions.com. Farmers can search internationally for their machines, dealers can learn which farmers are interested in upgrading, and both can get much more specific equipment information that helps them make money-saving decisions. Melnyk says the business is growing 20 percent this year despite the economic climate–or perhaps because of it. “The good deal is more important than ever,” he says.High-Tech Coupon ClippingThe seeds of a similar business, MyGroceryDeals.com, were those colorful advertising inserts that irritatingly flutter out from Sunday papers. It wasn’t an obscure IT term like DaaS that was on Paul Davis’s mind when he spread out the fliers on his kitchen table in 2004. It was how he would pay for his future roast beef sandwiches by inputting all the specials on the web. Davis, who had previously founded an in-store survey business, wanted to consolidate the constantly changing weekly specials from grocery stores and deliver them online so consumers could compare prices on Coke, Huggies or whatever else they bought. He also enabled the bargain-crazed to use the site to “pantry load” by finding the best local deals regardless of product Z.”If I had known how hard it would be, I’m not sure I would have done this,” sighs Davis, in an oft-heard entrepreneur’s lament. There were minor hitches, as one can imagine, in getting 160,000 ads per month organized for shoppers in 55,000 zip codes across the U.S. At one point, his computer server started choking on too many ads, slowing to “a chug, chug, chug,” says Davis, who had to spend an unexpected $500,000 to get his systems up to consumer-friendly speed again. “Often on Thursday we’d have no idea how we were going to make payroll on Friday.” But four years later, with 300,000 registered shoppers, Davis says MyGroceryDeals.com is close to breaking even on revenue from advertisers and coupon manufacturers. He is also launching a premium membership service and will start selling research from surveying his customers, his old specialty.Despite its growth, the site is still more or less a small business; MyGroceryDeals.com gets by with only five full-time employees. Davis doesn’t have to spend much to gather information since grocery chains now digitally feed their ads to MyGroceryDeals.com for free. If and when profit arrives, the number of people getting a piece of it will be relatively small–meaning, presumably, more data dollars for Davis. 7 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more