ESPN Names The 5 Biggest College Football Playoff “Sleepers”

first_imgCollege football playoff trophy surrounded by brackets.PlayoffWho are your College Football Playoff “sleepers”?ESPN has named theirs. The World Wide Leader, which also tabbed the five most-overrated College Football Playoff contenders, has released their five-biggest sleepers. By conference, they are:ACC – LouisvilleBig 12 – TCUBig Ten – Michigan StatePac-12 – UtahSEC – Ole MissLeading off a week of roundtable discussions on expectations for 2016, here are your CFB playoff sleepers: https://t.co/akNK5xhXBF— Mitch Sherman (@mitchsherman) May 16, 2016The “sleeper” with the best chance might be Michigan State. The Spartans get both Michigan and Ohio State in East Lansing, Mich. this season. Mark Dantonio’s squad’s toughest non-conference game comes at Notre Dame, but it also presents the team with a great opportunity for a signature win. Ole Miss and Louisville are probably talented enough to make it, but their schedules are more difficult and there are more proven teams in their respective conferences. TCU and Utah seem to have the toughest roads. [ESPN]last_img read more

Two Missing after Tug and Tanker Clash

first_imgzoom Two seafarers are reported missing after a tug boat Ayu Lestari sank due to a collision with an Italian-flagged crude oil tanker Mare Tirrenum some five miles south of the island of Pulau Rupat in the Strait of Malacca, Indonesia, the owner of the tanker Fratelli d’Amico Armatori SpA confirmed to World Maritime News.“At approximately 0038 hrs local time on March 7,  the vessel came into contact with a small vessel towing a barge carrying a cargo of palm oil and reportedly not complying with the COLREG regulations,” Carlo Cameli, General Manager of Fratelli d’Amico, said in an email.At the time of the incident the 110,673 dwt Mare Tirrenum was on ballast passage from Singapore and was approaching the pilot station of its next loading port, Dumai, Indonesia, Cameli said.“As a result of the collision, the towing vessel sank and two of its crew were rescued from the sea by the pilot boat. It was reported that two further crew members from the towing vessel were missing. The Master of the Mare Tirrenum immediately broadcast man overboard signals to passing vessels in the hope that the missing crew members could be found,” Cameli added.The search for the missing crewmembers is being led by local naval personnel.Cameli wrote that the oil tanker continued its journey to Dumai roads, adding that the incident did not cause any pollution or injuries to Mare Tirrenum’s crew.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Nova Scotia To Host Largest Gathering of Tall Ships In North America

first_imgThe largest gathering of Tall Ships in North America will sail into Nova Scotia ports July 13-23 for the Tall Ships Nova Scotia Festival 2007. “Tall Ships is the kind of event that fits perfectly with our tourism strategy because it lets people experience our maritime culture and history firsthand,” said Len Goucher, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage. “We expect more than 600,000 people on the waterfronts at participating ports across our province, bringing direct and indirect economic benefits as high as $19 million.” This year’s American Sail Training Association (ASTA) Tall Ships Challenge is the largest gathering of world-class Tall Ships beginning with a four-day event in Halifax from July 13 to 16. The Parade of Sail will be Monday, July 16. Designated ships will then head north to Cape Breton, with plans to visit the ports of Louisbourg, Port Hawkesbury and Sydney. Other ships will head to the mainland for planned stops at Pictou, Lunenburg, Shelburne and Yarmouth. The ships for each port, entertainment details and specific dates will be announced after they are finalized. “Tall Ships is a great event to showcase our province, and its natural treasures — our ports,” said Eric Thomson, chair of the Waterfront Development Corporation Ltd. (WDCL).”WDCL is proud to produce the Tall Ships Nova Scotia Festival 2007, and I encourage all of you to invite your friends and family home for the best party of the summer. Tall Ships from Canada, United States, United Kingdom, Germany, India and the Netherlands will participate in the 10-day festival. In addition to the Tall Ships fleet and the Nova Scotia Schooner Association fleet, there were be 12 to 15 classic yachts from the Marblehead race as well as 12 to 15 classic yachts from the Cruising Club of America fleet berthed on the Halifax waterfront, adding to the atmosphere of the event. The Halifax event differs slightly from the rest of the ports, as this is the finish line for the Tall Ships Challenge, an ASTA Tall Ships race from Newport, R.I., to Halifax. The American Sail Training Association has named Halifax the Port of the Year each time the city has hosted the Tall Ships event, and organizers are setting their sights on the award for 2007. “This gathering is truly an opportunity to showcase our province, our hospitality and maritime traditions,” said, festival director David Jones. “The Halifax Harbour is going to be alive with entertainment and activities, more than 60 vessels, and hundreds of international crew members.” The theme for the Halifax event is The Pirates are Coming and the Halifax waterfront has been divided into five zones that will have ships, entertainment, vendors and activities. During the day, the Dartmouth waterfront will host a Kid Zone at Pirate’s Landing. Children younger than 12 and their parents can learn how to walk and talk like a pirate, make costumes and dig for treasure as well as other activities. And what’s a pirate camp kid zone without ships — there will also be Tall Ships on the Dartmouth waterfront. The Halifax waterfront will have entertainment venues from the Cunard Centre in the south, to Casino Nova Scotia in the north. A large outdoor festival plaza will be located on the parking lot between Summit Place and the Waterfront Warehouse Restaurant. Detailed entertainment lineups will be announced closer to the event. There will be a mix of themed parties, concerts and an eclectic group of pirates and privateers, cannon battles and more along the waterfront each day. Festival organizers want to advise the public that there have been changes to marine security requirements since the 2004 event. International and Transport Canada security regulations may require adults to have photo ID to board some of the international ships. Children will be admitted with a parent that shows photo ID. There may be some ships that will be behind gates, and photo ID will also be required to board them. For more information on the ships, festival events, tickets and boarding passes see the website at www.tallshipsnovascotia.com.last_img read more

Fundraising down 40 per cent as topup controversy continues

first_img“I have been on the phone constantly to organisations over the past two weeks and they are extremely concerned that the people least able to live without their support – sick children, people with disabilities, families in need – are the ones who will most affected by this crisis in both confidence and donations.” FUNDRAISERS HAVE REPORTED a decline in donations by up to 40 per cent in the last two weeks, in light of the negative publicity surrounding the Section 38 agencies in general and the CRC controversy in particular.The estimated drop comes from Fundraising Ireland — the association for professional fundraisers — which says the finding is based on a straw poll and conversations with fundraising teams around the country.CEO Anne Hanniffy said the ongoing revelations were having a devastating impact on Irish charities, and that there were serious long-term implications for trust and confidence in the sector.“There is no denying but that this is one of the most serious periods faced by the Irish not-for-profit sector,” she said. Hanniffy said all charities should publish their accounts on-line as a matter of urgent public duty. She also called on the Government to establish the Charity Regulator within the first quarter of 2014.Read: Charities regulator to be in operation by 2014More: 7 things we learned from the CRC’s grilling by the PACRelated: Mater Hospital ‘refutes’ suggestions of operating a CRC ‘phantom fund’last_img read more

Farmers have added childcare responsibilities during busiest months due to income pressure

first_imgA FARMING SUPPORT group has issued its sympathies to the families of the young children who died in separate farm accidents recently, and says the pressures of low income are seeing more farmers being given the added responsibility for childcare.A five-year-old boy was killed in an accident on a farm in Co Offaly last week, and a three-year-old boy was fatally injured in an accident in Cork. The HSA is investigating both incidents.The Irish Cattle and Sheep Farmers’ Association (ICSA) says that farmers are increasingly taking on the responsibility of looking after their children during the busy summer months of farming as well as running their farms because low income is pushing their spouses into off-farm employment.“Statistics show that farming is one of the most dangerous occupations in terms of accidents and fatalities,” said the ICSA’s John Flynn.“Young children particularly should be kept away from dangers like machinery and livestock. However, we can’t lose sight of the fact that the farm is a home as well as a workplace.”Macra na Feirme National President, Kieran O’Dowd, said that farms are particularly busy places at this time of year, making it “essential that everyone on the farm are aware of the dangers and take precautions.”“Macra aims to instill a respect for farm safety right from the start of a young farmers career through initiatives and competitions which provide a practical insight,” he added.The agri sector records the highest number of workplace fatalities in Ireland. To date this year, 17 people have died in farm accidents – up from 16 across the whole of 2013. Last year, four children were killed in farm-related accidents.The HSA’s ‘Code of practice on preventing accidents to children and young persons in agriculture’ issues recommendations for improving farm safety, including guidelines on safe areas for play, safe supervision and training, and the operation of farm machinery.IFA President Eddie Downey said that while farming is a high-risk occupation, accidents can be reduced by taking extra time and care over farm tasks:Being tired, distracted and stressed is often a reality on busy farms and every effort must be made to avoid shortcuts. At the peak of this busy summer season on farms, safety must come first.Read: 46 people killed in workplace accidents last year >last_img read more

KFC Tests PlantBased Beyond Fried Chicken in Atlanta

first_img Finally, KFC Makes A Colonel Sanders Dating GameKFC’s Loaded Cheetos Sandwich Is Here to Sabotage Healthy Diets Kentucky Fried Plant-Based Chicken: KFC is the latest fast food restaurant to jump on the meat-substitute bandwagon.Beyond Fried Chicken debuts today as part of a limited, one-restaurant test in Atlanta, Ga.Stop by the Cobb Parkway location on Tuesday, Aug. 27 from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. for a complimentary sample of “a Kentucky fried miracle” (with purchase of any KFC menu item, while supplies last).Or, make it a meal and choose from various Colonel-approved Beyond Fried Chicken options, including six- or 12-piece nuggets or boneless wings with your choice of sauce.“KFC Beyond Fried Chicken is so delicious, our customers will find it difficult to tell that it’s plant-based,” Kevin Hochman, president and chief concept officer for KFC US, said in a statement.“I think we’ve all heard ‘It tastes like chicken,’” he continued. “Well, our customers are going to be amazed and say, ‘It tastes like Kentucky Fried Chicken!’” Stay on targetcenter_img It’s Kentucky Fried Chicken but it’s made with @BeyondMeat. It’s confusing, but it’s also delicious. Feast on these Kentucky Fried miracles tomorrow while they last at KFC in Atlanta, Georgia. pic.twitter.com/lC5oYM1cmk— KFC (@kfc) August 26, 2019KFC partnered with Beyond Meat to create a finger-lickin’-good alternative that appeals to carnivores and herbivores alike.“KFC is an iconic part of American culture and a brand that I, like so many consumers, grew up with,” Beyond Meat CEO Ethan Brown said. “To be able to bring Beyond Fried Chicken, in all of its KFC-inspired deliciousness, to market speaks to our collective ability to meet the consumer where they are and accompany them on their journey.“My only regret is not being able to see the legendary Colonel himself enjoy this important moment,” Brown added.Feedback from the Atlanta test will be considered as KFC evaluates a broader test, or potential national rollout.Though it seems that, after all this fanfare, they have to introduce Beyond Fried Chicken to the masses. Rival Impossible Foods may have cornered the burger market, but Beyond Meat is building its own army of plant-based substitutes.Early this month, Subway announced a new collaboration, aimed at exploring plant-based protein options—starting with the classic meatball sub.Drenched in marinara sauce and covered in cheese, the toasted hoagie will soon feature the very first Beyond Meatball, created exclusively for Subway.The sandwich maker will test the Beyond Meatball Marinara sub in 685 participating restaurants across North America in September.More on Geek.com:KFC’s Loaded Cheetos Sandwich Is Here to Sabotage Healthy DietsFinally, You Can Buy a KFC Drumstick That Will Last ForeverKFC’s New Colonel Is Unnervingly Attractive—And Completely Fakelast_img read more

Discount plant sale set at Prairie High School

first_imgPrairie High School is hosting a discount plant sale Friday and Saturday benefiting the high school horticulture program.Vegetables, flower pots and flower baskets are on sale at prices ranging from 75 cents to $15. Students grow tens of thousands of plants each year, some of which are used in school landscaping projects.The sale runs from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday in Prairie High School’s greenhouse, located at 11311 N.E. 119th St., Vancouver.last_img

Jokanovic insists Mitrovic is not to blame

first_imgFulham Football Club manager Slavisa Jokanovic has refused to blame Aleksandr Mitrovic after his side were held to a draw by Brighton & Hove Albion away from home.The Serbian striker conceded a late penalty which was duly converted by Brighton’s Glenn Murray to give the home side a point in their 2-2 draw against the Cottagers.The penalty meant Jokanovic’s side threw away a two-goal lead and the manager has refused to put the blame of Mitrovic’s shoulders.Official: Tottenham sign Fulham youngster Ryan Sessegnon Andrew Smyth – August 8, 2019 Tottenham have sealed another transfer deadline day deal to sign the highly-rated Ryan Sessegnon from Fulham.“In the end we gave them some kind of present, it’s really bad luck, Mitrovic touched the ball with his hand and he completed a really good game, scored a good goal, fighting well, this is part of football too and we must accept and try to fix some of the problems that we found during the game today.” Jokanovic said, according to HammyEnd.“It’s hard for him, he touched the ball in our box with his hand but it’s part of football too. These kind of mistakes are bad luck, it happens and he is strong enough not to be affected so much after this kind of situation, I am focussed on another part of the work, he scored another goal, he was fighting well, he was our target man and participated a lot, he must be satisfied.”last_img read more

Developer Drops Plans to Build Turbines that Would Have Limited Sheppard AFB

first_imgA developer considering building wind farms outside Sheppard AFB in north central Texas has opted to abandon the projects following an effort by the base and the Sheppard Military Affairs Committee (SMAC) to alert Innergex about the threat turbines pose to low-level military training routes used by pilots, reported the Times Record News. “These projects would have had serious negative impacts on our ability to safely manage both civilian and military air traffic in those areas and would also have reduced the overall number of effective flying training days we have each year,” base spokesman George Woodward said last week.Officials from the base and SMAC are hoping to reach out to developers sooner to avoid potential conflicts arising later. “We believe that, by working together and communicating early in the process, we can reach mutually compatible solutions not only in and around military bases, but also around FAA-designated military training routes and operating areas in Texas and Oklahoma,” Woodward said.SMAC President Glenn Barham said the organization would be talking with state lawmakers about a new Oklahoma law that is designed to prevent encroachment from wind farms by ensuring developers and base officials talk early in the planning process and submit projects to DOD’s Military Aviation and Installation Assurance Siting Clearinghouse.Photo courtesy of Times Record News Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Suspected drug peddler kidnapped and murdered by rivals in Kerala 2 detained

first_img(Representational image)Johannes Simon/Getty ImagesA 21-year-old suspected drug peddler was kidnapped and murdered by members of a rival gang in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, on Tuesday. The police detained two suspects on Wednesday.Anandhu Gireesh was reportedly kidnapped by two men during a temple festival in Konchiravilla, reports Deccan Chronicle. His body was found in an empty plot near the Government Polytechnic for Women near Karamana.The police have identified the suspects as Balu (19) and Roshan (21). According to The News Minute, Balu and Roshan are from Neeramankara.Reports suggest that Anandhu’s death was the result of a clash between two gangs. He was said to be the leader of one of the gangs. The gangs clashed during the Konchiravila temple festival on Tuesday which ended with Anandhu being kidnapped and eventually murdered.Some of Anandhu’s friends had received a phone call from his phone informing them about his abduction. The call was then cut and the mobile phone was switched off. On Wednesday morning, Anandhu’s body was found severed veins on his hands.The police reckon that he was left to die bleeding. His body was also found in a location frequented by drug peddlers and addicts.  Sanjay Kumar Garud, the Thiruvananthapuram City Police Commissioner, told Asianet News that multiple injuries were found on Anandhu’s body.   Close IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:04/1:42Loaded: 0%0:04Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-1:38?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …center_img Students march in anti-drug rally in Shimlalast_img read more

At University Of Houston Harveys Shadow Looms As Classes Restart

first_imgMichael Stravato for The Texas TribuneUniversity of Houston student Heather Williams, who is studying marketing, picks up her two kids, including Clover, 5, from a daycare set up by the university after Hurricane Harvey on September 5, 2017.At first glance, it looked like a typical day of classes at the University of Houston’s student rec center. People were playing basketball and lifting weights. Some were even studying. But one handball court in the back of the building betrayed that this wasn’t just a normal day.Several dozen children ages 5 to 12 were playing games like tag and Red Light/Green Light in the noisy gym. They had all been hastily dropped off there by UH students, staff and faculty who, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, needed somewhere to keep their kids.“We didn’t have any other place to go,” said Ana Pena, an employee at the college of optometry, as she picked up her foster daughter for lunch Tuesday afternoon. “This is a life-saver.”Tuesday was the first day back at class for UH, the biggest public university in a city still reeling from the hurricane that flooded miles of streets and destroyed thousands of homes and businesses. The campus just south of downtown sustained barely any damage, aside from a handful of flooded buildings that are expected to be repaired within days. But like their city, many students, faculty and staff are facing months or years of recovery. Many lost homes or cars. Almost all suffered through a hellish week during which their city practically shut down.But administrators were determined to get the school back up and running quickly. There were no vigils or grand gestures of unity on campus Tuesday. Instead, students and staff seemed to be trying their hardest to return to normal. Many classes were near full. The line for food in the student union snaked around the building. And sororities and student groups were recruiting new members on the sidewalks.Administrators were hoping for that sense of normalcy after having to cancel the first full week of class. (School started at UH on Aug. 21.) If things didn’t pick up soon, the semester risked being wasted.“We have to pull together and start building up our community,” said Renu Khator, the school’s president and chancellor.The childcare situation highlighted how much of a challenge that would be. Houston’s K-12 schools are closed for another week, and many of the daycare facilities around town haven’t reopened. Khator encouraged supervisors to allow parents to bring their children with them to work.Administrators scrambled to turn the recreation center into a makeshift daycare facility. An announcement went out Saturday, and the center’s employees manned a phone bank Sunday and Monday to take reservations. Parents described making repeated calls for over an hour to land one of the limited spots.Once the kids arrived, the staff had to find activities for them. The children spent much of the time watching movies, drawing pictures and running around the gym.But even with that problem solved, people on campus understood many more challenges remained. Eight classrooms and one university-run student apartment complex remain unusable. Professors have to figure out how to deal with that week of missed class. And students have to find their focus after a harrowing few days. “It has been a little bit weird,” said Heather Williams, a marketing major. “Everyone is a little shell shocked.”Williams said her home wasn’t damaged in the storm. But she does hair and makeup for weddings, and has already had three weeks of bookings canceled by the storm. That will be a big financial hit, and will only make the semester more challenging for the mother of two.Professors have been urged to be flexible. Many of the 2,500 students who rode out the storm on campus were able to transition back to school quickly. Others lost their homes. Cathy Horn, a professor and chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, said she has spent the last few days helping students and faculty figure the answers to a variety of questions. How do people get to campus if their car was destroyed? How do they study if their textbooks were damaged?Some faculty members, she said, are trying to figure out how to move more of their courses online. Others are temporarily homeless themselves. University officials estimated that about 10 percent of the faculty couldn’t make it to work on Tuesday, though many found substitutes to handle their classes.But amid the confusion, students and faculty said they had been inspired by the outpouring of support. Horn helped organize a Facebook group called “Faculty Helping Faculty During Hurricane Harvey.” More than 60 professors have offered spare rooms or other living space to colleagues who had been displaced. Dozens, she said, took those professors up on the offer. And students from the UH honors college helped clean out or repair about 30 professors’ homes in the last five days.“We are an amazingly generous community,” Horn said. “I have never felt so loved by friends and strangers alike.” Sharelast_img read more

Funds in KMC fixed deposit to be spent on providing amenities

first_imgKolkata: Mayor Firhad Hakim reiterated on Monday that funds in the fixed deposit of the civic body will be utilised only for development work and civic amenities and any wastage of such funds will not be tolerated.Replying to a query from Congress councillor Prakash Upadhyay regarding the existing amount in the fixed deposit of the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) at the monthly meeting, Hakim said: “We have an amount of Rs 17.10 crore till February 2018. The funds in the fixed deposit, whether it is more or less, does not matter. What matters most is offering services and civic amenities to the people. Since the Trinamool Congress took over the board of the KMC in 2010, it has provided civic amenities in the form of potable drinking water, lights, development of slums, an overhaul of the drainage system, scientific plan for solid waste management etc.” Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseAccording to Hakim, when Subrata Mukherjee of the TMC ended his term as the Mayor in 2005, the amount of fixed deposit stood at Rs 377.16 crore. When Bikash Bhattacharya of the Left Front board took over as Mayor, he sold a number of plots of land and the fixed deposit went up to Rs 721.25 crore. Hakim further informed that when Bhattacharya’s term as Mayor ended in 2010, he left Rs 588. 67 crore in the fixed deposit of the KMC. “The revenue earning is a part our job but our main aim is to ensure that the citizens get the best of amenities,” he maintained. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe Mayor further said that the KMC has set a target of three years to ensure the supply of potable drinking water to every single pocket in the city. “There are problems in certain pockets, particularly in the added areas in the southern part, and we are taking all possible measures to augment water supply. The capacity of the Garden Reach Waterways is being raised by 25 million gallon and we are also constructing small booster pumping stations in these areas to boost water supply,” he added.last_img read more

Craft fair to usher in new year

first_imgA fortnight of cultural performances and an event to celebrate Indian art, crafts, and textiles, Dastkari Haat Samiti returns with the much-awaited crafts bazaar of the year. Conceptualised by textile revivalist Jaya Jaitly, the 33rd edition of the Bazaar will open on January 1, 2019, at Dilli Haat, INA, Delhi.The event will also feature workshops and performances by Mushtaq Ahmed, a flute maker from Varanasi; Moorala Marwada, a Sufi folk singer from the Janana village of the Kutch District, Gujarat who will sing the Also Read – Add new books to your shelfpoetry of Kabir, Mirabai, Ravidas and others; and Bhawani Kalindi and his group from Bengal who will perform the exotic tribal martial Chhau dance throughout the tenure of the bazaar. The distinctive line-up of the 15-day event includes craft and skill exchange program with Indonesia, supported by the O/o Development Commissioner Handicrafts, Ministry of Textiles. The workshop will begin from January 2 with Indonesian artisan who excel in doyo fibre craft, pottery, tie, and dye and batik work paired with their Indian counterparts V, Sadanandam and Y Sridhar in fibre weaving, Telangana and AP, Harikishan in Pottery, New Delhi, Sabina Khatoon in Batik, West Bengal, and Abdul Wahab Khatri in tie and dye, Gujarat. The innovative art pieces thus created will be displayed in the last two days. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveEstablished in 1986, Dastkari Haat Samiti helps over 60,000 artisans by organising annual crafts bazaar all over India that provide them with the exposure and bring them into direct contact with the urban customer. Supporting over 350 crafts groups across the 29 Indian states, the organisation believes in helping artisans and their families in every possible way. “Since the inception in 1986, our aim has been to break the barriers between the craftsmen and community by giving them a platform to showcase their craft. Our annual craft bazaar at Dilli Haat brings that authenticity of handloom and handmade products back with traditional weaves, sustainable home decor and so many more crafts from different states of India.”, shares Jaya Jaitly, Founder of Dastkari Haat Samiti. The craft bazaar will feature everything from a wide range of Vankar shawls of Gujarat, Banarasi textiles from Uttar Pradesh, Handloom Fabrics from Bengal, Bandhani from Gujarat, Handwoven Chanderi, Softest of Pashminas, Ajrakh block printing, Kantha embroidery, Pattachitra paintings, Inlay furniture, papier mache, carpets, durries, home decor accessories and organic products.last_img read more

City looks at heavy rainfall on Sunday after 48 hrs of discomfort

first_imgKolkata: The city-dwellers may witness hot and humid weather in the next two days before a heavy shower hits the South Bengal districts on Sunday, predicted the Regional Meteorological Centre in Alipore.The weather office, however, says that scattered rainfall may occur in various places of South Bengal in the next two days. But the rain will not be able to bring down the temperature and reduce the humidity level. The weather office says that the temperature will go down slightly in the city and the South Bengal districts following the heavy rain expected on Sunday. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataIt may be mentioned here that Bengal has received less rainfall in June compared to previous years, due to the late onset of monsoon and an irregularity in the rainfall. The situation may not improve in the current month as there may be a rain deficit in the state. The paddy cultivation has also been affected in different districts due to scarcity of rainfall. Various crops were also damaged due to high humidity levels. The rain deficit in the last month has affected the farmers and they may face a similar fate in July as there is also a prediction of rain deficit in the current month as well. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateWeather experts said that the monsoon deficit in South Bengal currently stands at 48 percent, while the North Bengal districts have received heavy rainfall ever since the South-Western monsoon made incursion into the region. A weather official said that the sky in the city and in various other South Bengal districts remains mostly cloudy as of now. Once the cloud disappears, the mercury and humidity may further go up. It is expected that people in South Bengal may have to face discomfort for another two days. Once a heavy rain lashes the city, the humidity level will go down. The irregular rainfall has also been affecting the people, many of whom are complaining of fever and other ailments due to the fluctuating weather. The city doctors have also issued some tips in order to stay fit. They said children should drink more water and avoid spicy foods. People have been advised to bathe twice a day to get relief from the hot weather condition. They have also asked the people to avoid direct sunlight.last_img read more

A Secret Knights Templar Tunnel that Remained Hidden for 700 Years

first_imgIn the Middle Ages, crusaders from the Latin West left an indelible mark on the cities of the Near East, constructing castles and fortresses that would withstand successive waves of conquest. Many of these castles still stand today, and in some cases, remain in use. Krak des Chevaliers, perhaps the most iconic crusader castle, was even occupied and used as a military base in the recent Syrian conflict.Templars Tunnel. Photo by Dennis Jarvis CC BY SA 2.0However, many of these impressive structures have yet to give up all of their secrets. Even in the late 20th century, crusader structures were still being discovered in the Levant, the most notable of which was the 350 meter (985 feet) “Templar tunnel” running underneath the modern city of Acre. These discoveries continue to shed light on this fascinating period of Middle Eastern history.Remains of the Crusader-period Pisan Harbour. Photo by Dainis Matisons CC BY 2.0The Templars were a military religious order, originally founded to ensure the safety of the regular stream of pilgrims that made the arduous and dangerous journey from Western Europe to the Holy Land.According to historian Dan Jones, they were so named because their original headquarters stood next to the Temple of the Lord in Jerusalem, and in the 12th and 13th century they played an important role in defining the political and military successes (and failures) of the crusader states in the Levant.Pictures depicting the Knights Templar (brother-servant, a brother-brother Knight and priest)In 1187, however, the city of Jerusalem was lost after a decisive victory by the Ayyubid leader Salah ad-Din (otherwise known as Saladin) at Hattin. The crusader states had lost their capital, and their shock defeat at the hands of a powerful Muslim army launched what would later be known as the Third Crusade.According to Jones, several large armies set out from England and France to provide aid to the beleaguered crusader kingdoms, with the goal of reconquering Jerusalem.Seal of the TemplarsThis was a vain hope, and the armies of the Third Crusade, led (amongst others) by Richard the Lionheart, would eventually leave without reclaiming Jerusalem. However, they did manage to recover the important port city of Acre.Following a long siege led by the king of Jerusalem, Guy de Lusignan, the Muslim inhabitants of the city surrendered, and Acre became the new capital of the crusader states.Ever fearful of a renewed attack by Saladin and his successors, the Templars set about constructing an impressive fortress at Acre. The settlement was already well protected by high walls and the surrounding sea, but the new Christian occupants proceeded to construct seemingly impenetrable defenses.According to Jones, Acre was a strategically significant Mediterranean port, and controlling it was key to controlling access to the rest of the region. However, this meant that it was constantly under threat, both from enemies outside its walls, and from infighting amongst those within.This may explain why the Templars decided to construct a secret underground tunnel, leading from the fortress to the port. This would ensure a quick, easy escape for any inhabitants in case the city was overthrown and could provide a useful, secret channel for supplies if the city was besieged.Templars Tunnel – Crusader Structure – Akko (Acre). Photo by Adam Jones CC BY SA 2.0However, in 1291, disaster struck. Acre was attacked and taken by the Mamluk ruler of Egypt, Sultan al-Ashraf Khalil, and he ordered that the city be razed to the ground to prevent further Christian reoccupation. This once-pivotal, strategic port fell into insignificance.However, in 1994, over 700 years after the fall of the fortress, a startling discovery was made by a woman living in the modern city of Acre. When she sent a local plumber to investigate the cause of her blocked drains, he stumbled into a medieval tunnel running right underneath her house.The Templar Tunnel. Photo by Tango7174 CC BY-SA 4.0Further excavations revealed that the tunnel had been constructed in the Crusader period, and ran all the way from the fortress to the port. This was an extremely significant discovery, as it’s one of the rare pieces of Crusader architecture in Acre to have survived the invasion of the Mamluks.Read another story from us: Untouched and Unlooted 4,400-yr-old Tomb of Egyptian High Priest DiscoveredToday, it’s even possible to visit the tunnel, which has been fully restored, cleaned and drained. Although the Templar fortress may be long gone, modern tourists can still walk in the footsteps of these crusading knights, 700 years after their deaths.last_img read more

VIDEO Man forcibly dragged off overbooked flight for not giving up his

first_imgAir travel isn’t what it used to be. People today feel more like cattle herded into an overcrowded flying tin barn than valued customers.Just when you thought flying commercial couldn’t get any more demeaning, a video surfaced today of a man – reportedly a doctor – being forcibly dragged off an overbooked United flight from Chicago to L.A.Apparently, the poor guy was selected as the passenger to give up his seat. He refused. That’s when United made the genius decision to drag him off the flight while bloodied and screaming. It’s like an awful scene out of Fahrenheit 151.Of course, the entire thing was captured on video. It will probably be Exhibit A in the massive lawsuit this guy is about to file. Also, way to just sit there and do nothing, everyone on the damn flight. Pathetic. Advertisement Here’s the video of the PR disaster as it unfolded:When a passenger refused to leave an overbooked United flight, he was forcibly dragged off the plane pic.twitter.com/yEQJJh6jEo— . (@earth_universee) April 10, 2017last_img read more

Hot Dudes With Dogs Instagram is making a calendar and its so

first_imgeTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) A picture from @officiallydeen featured on @hotdudeswithdogs | Photo: @hotdudeswithdogs Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… GAYSTARNEWS- ‘HOLD THE SHOOT, got to take this phone call.’ | Photo: Provided to Gay Star News by @HotDudesWithDogs InstagramThey succeed‘Oh, it’s for you’ | Photo: Provided to Gay Star News by @HotDudesWithDogs InstagramBut they also have a social mission tooOn their website they say:‘Unfortunately, not all dogs are lucky enough to have a hot dude to call their own. Each year, over 2 million homeless hounds are euthanized due to overcrowding in “high kill” shelters across the country.’‘We believe that every dog deserves a second chance, so we donate a portion of our proceeds to nonprofit organizations that rescue dogs from shelters and help them find loving homes.’You can follow @HotDudesWithDogs on Instagram.So Fetch | Photo: @HotDudesWithDogs Instagram StoryRead more from Gay Star News:Gus Kenworthy celebrates National Puppy Day with his adopted pupcenter_img You have to see the 10 cutest pooches at Sydney’s Doggywood pagaent Straight guy hilariously freaks out over his dog being called gay13 fabulous pics from Northalsted Market Days that prove it’s #AmazingforAllAustin Armacost is now the face of a gay sauna in LondonRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/hot-dudes-with-dogs-instagram-calendar/ Hot Dudes With Dogs has everything.Hot Dudes? Check.Dogs? Check.And now, in even more incredible news that will send your cute aggression into overload: They are making a calendar.They teased a photoshoot on social media yesterday, and it piqued our interest.They posted: ‘There’s a Hot Dudes With Dogs photo shoot going down today! Watch our stories this afternoon for a behind the scenes look #hotdudeswithdogs’ | Photo: @HotDudesWithDogs InstagramAnd they have told Gay Star News, not only are they working on a 2020 Hot Dudes with Dog Calendar, a stylish coffee table book is on the way too.They also shared these exclusive behind the scenes shots of the calendar shoot with us:The models (and the dudes) | Photo: Provided to Gay Star News by @HotDudesWithDogs InstagramThey did the shoot yesterday at the Makebelieve.jpg a rooftop club in New YorkFLOOF | Photo: Provided to Gay Star News by @HotDudesWithDogs InstagramHot Dudes With Dogs says they have one simple mission: to make people drool over the ultimate eye candy When I’m trying to explain what I use Instagram for to anyone new to the platform, there is only one account I need.last_img read more

Kevin Spaceys new film Billionaire Boys Club earns 126 on opening day

first_imgJudi Dench defends ‘good friend’ Kevin SpaceyTrailer drops for Kevin Spacey’s new film where he plays gay billionaireThe lessons gay men can learn from ‘handsy’ Kevin SpaceyRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/kevin-spaceys-new-film-billionaire-boys-club-earns-126-on-opening-day/ Kevin Spacey in Billionaire Boys Club | Photo: Billionaire Boys Club New movie Billionaire Boys Club starring Kevin Spacey has taken a paltry $126 (£98.78, €110.06) in the US box office on opening day. GAYSTARNEWS- Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…center_img eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) The movie opened on limited release on Friday 17 August.Billionaire Boys Club also stars Ansel Elgort, Taron Egerton, Emma Roberts and Jeremy Irvine.Its Rotten Tomatoes score makes for even more embarrassing reading. It’s currently certified 13% ‘rotten’, based on eight reviews.‘All popped collars, douchey bros’Writing for the Hollywood Reporter, one critic said: ‘It’s a derivative bore, all popped collars, douchey bros and hand-me-down psychology, that gets its characters up to their necks in borrowed money just long enough to have it really hurt when the accounts run dry.’ [embedded content]Last month, Robin Wright spoke out for the first time on the accusations of sexual abuse leveled against Kevin Spacey by various men.Spacey was Wright’s costar in the Netflix series House of Cards.She said she was ‘surprised’ and ‘ultimately saddened’ by what transpired.‘A respectful, professional relationship,’ was how Wright described her interactions with Spacey.‘He was so great with me… never disrespectful to me. That’s my personal experience, that’s the only thing I feel that I have the right to talk about.’Amidst the scandal last October, Spacey finally came out as gay after years of rumors of around his sexuality.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us .last_img read more

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first_imgWhole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast CancerVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 11:16Loaded: 1.44%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -11:16 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Radiation Oncology | February 01, 2018 ​ITN Celebrates World Cancer Day 2018 World Cancer Day takes place annually on Feb. read more News | Women’s Health | November 14, 2018 Merit Medical Completes Acquisition of Cianna Medical Disposable device manufacturer Merit Medical Systems Inc. announced the closing of a definitive merger agreement to… read more News | April 23, 2009 Radiation Device Shows Low Risk of Infection in Breast Cancer Patients Videos | Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with… read more Related Content News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women’s Healthcare | October 04, 2017 Trial Confirms Effectiveness of High-Dose Brachytherapy, Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer Findings from a new multicenter, international clinical trial confirm the effectiveness of high-dose brachytherapy or… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women’s Healthcare | October 25, 2018 Xoft Electronic Brachytherapy System Effective in Early-Stage Breast Cancer iCAD Inc. announced new clinical research demonstrating positive outcomes supporting the use of the Xoft Axxent… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women’s Healthcare | January 07, 2019 Electronic Brachytherapy Effective in Long-Term Study of 1,000 Early-Stage Breast Cancers Breast cancer recurrence rates of patients treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) using the Xoft Axxent… read more April 23, 2009 – A new study shows that the SAVI applicator, a small, expandable device inserted inside the breast to deliver partial breast irradiation, carries a low infection risk, a potential complication of such devices. The research, led by radiation oncologists and surgeons at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center and Fort Myers, Florida-based 21st Century Oncology, also indicates that other complications – such as seromas, pockets of fluid that build with the use of internal radiation devices – are unlikely to occur.That’s good news for those women with early-stage breast cancer who opt to have such devices inserted for their radiation therapy after breast-sparing lumpectomy surgery, said Catheryn Yashar, M.D., associate professor of radiation oncology at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and chief of breast and gynecological radiation services at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center. Their use is increasing, she added, noting that the Moores UCSD Cancer Center was one of the first medical facilities in the country to offer SAVI. SAVI, which consists of flexible catheters through which radiation is given, provides customized radiation therapy and minimizes exposure to healthy tissue after a woman has undergone a lumpectomy to remove a cancerous tumor. Radiation specialists sometimes decide to give women internal radiation – a process called brachytherapy – with the goal of giving concentrated doses of radiation to areas of concern while avoiding healthy tissue.In the study, researchers examined one-year follow-up data on 63 patients treated with the Food and Drug Administration-approved SAVI device. They found an infection rate that is less than half of the published rates associated with balloon brachytherapy methods, and rated overall cosmetic outcomes with SAVI as “excellent.” The results will be presented at the American Society of Breast Surgeon’s annual meeting in San Diego, April 24, 2009.In addition, physicians were able to use the device’s many catheters to customize the radiation dose based on the woman’s needs, greatly minimizing radiation to the heart, lungs, ribs and skin, likely resulting in fewer complications, Yashar said. To date, there have been no recurrences or formation of persistent seromas.“With a full year of follow-up, our research confirms previous findings that this device is safe and effective for radiation delivery, especially compared to other brachytherapy methods,” said Yashar. “Without the ability to customize the dose, other devices can lead to complications, like persistent seroma and skin burns. This applicator was created to overcome these problems, and our research shows it has been successful.”Breast brachytherapy is a form of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI). Lasting just five days, APBI offers a shorter course of radiation compared to the six weeks required with traditional whole breast irradiation.“SAVI has the most flexible dose modulation for single-entry APBI applicators and can sculpt the radiation dose to the size and shape of the tumor cavity and the patient’s anatomy, even when only one to two millimeters from normal tissues,” Yashar said.Without the technical limitations of other methods such as balloon brachytherapy, SAVI substantially increases the number of women who qualify for the benefits of APBI.Other authors of the poster being presented at ASBS are Daniel Scanderbeg, Anne Wallace, Sarah Blair and Patrick Barna, UC San Diego; and Constantine Mantz, 21st Century Oncology. The SAVI breast brachytherapy applicator is made by Cianna Medical, Inc.The Moores UCSD Cancer Center is one of the nation’s 41 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, combining research, clinical care and community outreach to advance the prevention, treatment and cure of cancer. For more information: www.cancer.ucsd.edu and www.ciannamedical.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women’s Healthcare | December 19, 2017 Intraoperative Radiotherapy Provides Lifetime Cost Savings, Health Benefits for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treatment iCAD Inc. announced the results of a landmark study that showed the benefits of adjunct intraoperative radiation… read more Videos | Brachytherapy Systems, Women’s Healthcare | November 07, 2018 VIDEO: Improving Breast Cancer Surgery With Electronic Brachytherapy IORT An interview with… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women’s Healthcare | October 02, 2018 Xoft Electronic Brachytherapy System Effective Long-Term for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Breast cancer recurrence rates for patients treated with the Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (eBx) System that… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women’s Healthcare | October 31, 2017 Cleveland Clinic Leads Development of New Guidelines for Radiation in Breast Cancer October 31, 2017 — Cleveland Clinic researcher Chirag Shah, M.D., recently led the development of updated guidelines read more Video Player is loading.Nisar Syed Explains Electro-brachytherapy IORT at ASTRO 2018Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:09Loaded: 1.99%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:09 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.last_img read more

VIDEO CT for Chest Pain Evaluation in The Emergency Department

first_imgVideos | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 05, 2015 VIDEO: CT for Chest Pain Evaluation in The Emergency Department Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Recent Videos View all 606 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Technology Reports View all 9 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.”center_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Information Technology View all 220 items Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Interview with Harold Litt, M.D., Ph.D., chief of cardiovascular imaging section and associate professor of radiology, University of Pennsylvania. He also served as co-principal investigator of the ACRIN-PA study of cardiac CT use in the emergency department (ED). Litt spoke in sesveral sessions on how to begin using cardiac CT to evaluate chest pain to quickly rule in or rule out heart attacks.Read more about the ACRIN-PA trial. Watch a video of Litt explaining the trial. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. 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Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more news and videos from AAPM. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Herelast_img read more