South Korea has H5N1 in poultry after 3-year lull

first_imgNov 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – South Korea has reported its first outbreak of H5N1 avian influenza in nearly 3 years, on a poultry farm in North Jeolla province, about 100 miles from Seoul.The virus was detected in dead poultry on a farm in the city of Iksan that raises parent stock for broiler chickens, according to a report that a South Korean livestock official filed Nov 22 with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The report said the outbreak caused 6,500 deaths among 13,000 susceptible birds. The results were confirmed at the National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service in Anyang.The source of the outbreak is unknown, though Reuters reported that the farm lies on a bird migration route.The last poultry outbreak in South Korea occurred in December 2003 and prompted the culling of 5 million birds. No human cases of H5N1 illness have ever been reported in the country, but South Korea’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention said in September that five workers who helped cull poultry nearly 3 years ago showed evidence of past infection with H5N1 avian influenza, though they had not been ill.According to a report today in the Korea Times, the South Korean agriculture ministry has begun culling 236,000 poultry on six Iksan poultry farms. A 3-kilometer quarantine zone was set up around the outbreak site, and a 10-kilometer surveillance zone covers 200 poultry farms in Iksan, Sochon, and Kumgang. Authorities have also banned the sale and shipment of poultry, eggs, and related products from the area and have set up checkpoints to inspect trucks.Farms in the surveillance zone raise more than 50 million chickens and ducks, the Times reported.Several media outlets reported today that South Korean health officials plan on culling cats, dogs, and other animals such as pigs in the area to control the spread of the disease. The Associated Press (AP) said South Korea culled dogs and cats along with 5.3 million birds during its last outbreak in 2003.However, Peter Roeder, an animal health expert with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), told the AP that he questions the validity of culling cats and dogs. “It’s highly unusual, and it’s not a science-based decision,” he said. “We’ve got absolutely no reason to believe they’re important.”Meanwhile, surveillance samples from apparently healthy birds on a farm 87 miles north of the outbreak site have tested positive for avian influenza, and more tests are being done to determine if the strain is highly pathogenic, according to another report today in the Korea Times. The virus was detected in a pair of chickens hatched from eggs purchased in mid November from a breeding farm in the Iksan area.Ministry officials told the Times that the highly pathogenic virus is unlikely because there have been no mass chicken deaths on the farms.Elsewhere, the H5N1 virus was detected in two turkeys that died in early November in Ivory Coast, according to an Agence France-Presse report last week. The turkeys came from a livestock camp at a village near Abidjan in the south. The country’s last outbreak in poultry was in May.Health officials told AFP that health and safety measures had been taken and that people who were exposed to the birds were under medical supervision.See also:Nov 23 OIE notice on H5N1 in poultry in South Koreahttp://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/A2006_AI.phpSep 21 CIDRAP News article “Five Koreans had H5N1 virus but no illness”last_img read more

Lowset home at The Gap, on 604sq m block, needs new owners

first_imgMore from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 20193 Tallawong Place, The Gap.Mr Thompson is selling the three-bedroom, two-bathroom home with plans to move to an acreage property at Burpengary.Set in a quiet cul-de-sac, the home is on a level 604sq m block, located 8km from the CBD and within proximity to all amenities.Mr Thompson has done some renovations to the home which included doing up the gardens and putting in a swimming pool. He has also installed ducted airconditioning, put in new carpets and a water tank.“It really is a quiet oasis,” Mr Thompson said.“It’s a lovely street and we’ve got good neighbours.“The Gap Village is nearby and it’s got everything you need, it’s just getting better and better.” 3 Tallawong Place, The Gap.When Will Thompson bought this lowset property, at 3 Tallawong Place, The Gap, he had his elderly mother’s interests in mind.But the time has come for him to sell the property he has owned for 10 years after his mum went into care recently.Mr Thompson, a book keeper, said he bought in The Gap area to be closer to his family.“I had two sisters living around there,” he said. “It’s such a lovely suburb with a great community spirit.” 3 Tallawong Place, The Gap.The home features three bedrooms plus a study/home office, master suite with walk-in-robe, ensuite and private courtyard.There is an alfresco setting which overlooks lush tropical gardens. There’s a heated spa and swimming pool with exercise jets.Mr Thompson hopes a young family or retired couple will buy his property.“We’ve had many great memories here,” he said.“There’s been Christmas gatherings, and anniversaries too.”center_img 3 Tallawong Place, The Gap.last_img read more