Monmouth, Fairfield meet in conference play

first_img Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditMonmouth (13-8, 7-3) vs. Fairfield (8-12, 4-5)Webster Bank Arena at Harbor Yard, Bridgeport, Connecticut; Tuesday, 7 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Monmouth visits Fairfield in a MAAC matchup. Monmouth won 90-84 at home against Rider on Sunday. Fairfield lost 68-52 on the road to Rider on Friday. February 3, 2020 Monmouth, Fairfield meet in conference play VETERAN PRESENCE: Senior leadership could play a big role in this game’s outcome. Landon Taliaferro, Vincent Eze and Aidas Kavaliauskas have combined to score 42 percent of Fairfield’s points this season. For Monmouth, Ray Salnave, Deion Hammond and Mustapha Traore have scored 54 percent of the team’s points this season, including 65 percent of all Hawks points over their last five.MAAC IMPROVEMENT: The Hawks have scored 62.9 points per game across 10 conference games, an improvement from the 65.5 per game they managed over 11 non-conference games.SOLID SALNAVE: Salnave has connected on 46.6 percent of the 88 3-pointers he’s attempted and has made 12 of 28 over his last five games. He’s also made 87.3 percent of his foul shots this season.WINLESS WHEN: The Hawks are 0-5 when they score 63 points or fewer and 13-3 when they exceed 63 points. The Stags are 0-9 when allowing 64 or more points and 8-3 when holding opponents below 64.STREAK SCORING: Fairfield has won its last three home games, scoring an average of 64 points while giving up 55.3.DID YOU KNOW: Monmouth has committed a turnover on just 18.4 percent of its possessions this season, which is the second-best percentage among all MAAC teams. The Hawks have turned the ball over only 13.1 times per game this season.center_img Associated Press ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.comlast_img read more

Medical clowning courses help students, patients

first_imgOne can often find professor Caitlyn Conlin working in a hospital -— but not in a traditional medical profession. Conlin, sporting a red nose, interacts with young hospitalized patients through the art of medical clowning, which is targeted at transforming the experience of hospitalization for patients. “If someone wants to talk about their trip to Alaska, the clown will play with that,” Conlin said. “If someone wants to talk about monsters and zombies, then the clown will do that. So the content is different, but the play is still the same.” This story has been updated for clarity. “I started interacting with different objects in the hallway around the room and pretending that they were alive,” Conlin said. “Doctors and nurses were passing through the hallway,  and I turned it into a parade … a beautiful, amazing parade.” School of Dramatic Arts professors Zachary Steel (left) and Caitlyn Conlin (right) teach courses on medical clowning. (Photo courtesy of Caitlyn Conlin) “The philosophy of clowning … when you  participate in a medical clowning class, you do exercises that allow you to tap into a certain state of being that is completely free and has unlimited imagination,” Conlin said. Steel said that medical clowning may also give hope to patients’ families. On one visit with unconscious patient, Conlin and Steel said they were able to change the mother’s experience at the hospital. “It’s really not about ‘Oh, look at me, I’m a clown on stage,’” Chow said. “It’s like, ‘OK, I’m here for you.’” According to Conlin, by interacting with the patients actively, the medical clowns are able to gain trust from patients and create beautiful memories with them. She improvised a performance to engage with a shy boy. Conlin also said medical clowning is all about improvisation and intimate interaction with patients and the environment. Conlin said the magic of medical clowning lies not only in healing patients but also in giving hope to patients’ families. When Conlin and Steel met with an unconscious patient, the nurse said there was not much the medical clowns could do. However, the patient’s mother called them in, and they said they were able to successfully implore the mother’s experience in the hospital. The course explores the philosophies of medical clowning and offers students opportunities to perform in hospitals. Steel said that in the class, students learn the principles of theatrical clowning to reveal the “most innocent and pure” parts of themselves to pursue joy and take this newly discovered joy to hospitals.  center_img “It’s very meaningful to the mother to have someone treating her daughter with the same feeling of aliveness… That was really important for the mother to keep the hope going,” Conlin said.       However, Steel said that surprises are needed sometimes because they want to promote optimism in hospital environments. They want patients to feel comfortable with their surroundings. Conlin said that children and adult patients have different responses to medical clowns. She said adults are at first more hesitant to open themselves to more creative outlets. But once patients have experienced medical clowning, Conlin said they realize the clowns can tailor the experience to their age and topics they want to discuss. As opposed to other types of clowning, medical clowning aims to build one-to-one immersive interactions with patients, rather than facing a large audience. Christina Chow, a senior majoring in biological sciences who is currently taking Steel and Conlin’s class. “You are only doing what you are given the permission to do by the patients,” Steel said. There are rules to medical clowning because of the environment that the hospitals provide. Steel said a medical clown should avoid speaking loudly and remember to be respectful to their surroundings. Conlin said she accompanied the boy on his way to the operation room and made him feel comfortable. Conlin and professor Zachary Steel from the School of Dramatic Arts teach the medical clowning courses. Along with their instructors, students are able to go to hospitals to apply what they have learned in class and build long-term bonds with patients. “When I go into the hospital, I have nothing planned,” she said. “I mean, I do have songs that I know that I’ll sing sometime when singing comes up, but I don’t plan what I’m going to sing. A lot of times I don’t plan what song I’m going to sing and a lot of times I make up songs … You are pushing yourself into unknown places and a sort of magic starts to happen in the moment. ” last_img read more

Former football coach Steve Sarkisian loses $30 million lawsuit against USC

first_imgFormer USC head coach Steve Sarkisian lost in his $30 million wrongful termination suit against the University. Before the fall · Sarkisian heads a USC football practice before he was released after multiple incidents related to his alcohol problems | Daily Trojan file photoEarlier this week, an arbitration hearing held in Los Angeles County Superior Court ruled against Sarkisian, the current Atlanta Falcons’ offensive coordinator. He has since said he will no longer pursue the matter.“I am disappointed in the decision, but we will respect it and move on,” said Sarkisian in a statement, according to the Los Angeles Times. Sarkisian was terminated by USC in 2015 after repeated instances of drunken behavior. Prior to the 2015 season, he was caught on video slurring his words and saying multiple expletives at a booster event. Later in the season, he was allegedly intoxicated during various team meetings, practices and even games. Former Athletic Director Pat Haden fired Sarkisian in October 2015, naming Clay Helton as the interim head coach. In his lawsuit, Sarkisian alleged that USC did not allow him time to undergo treatment for alcoholism, prior to his ouster. He said he was going through a divorce at the time. “Instead of supporting its head coach, Steve Sarkisian, when he needed its help the most, USC kicked him to the curb,” read his complaint filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court a couple of months after his termination. In the case, Sarkisian aimed to receive the outlying $12.6 million from his original contract. He sued USC on the basis he was fired over a disability. However, those allegations were shot down in the arbitration hearing. Per Deadspin, the hearing concluded that he was terminated over his detrimental behavior related to alcoholism, ruling it a “failure to control a controllable disability.” “We are pleased that the arbitration has reached its rightful conclusion and we wish Steve Sarkisian well,” USC Athletic Director Lynn Swann said in a statement.After his exit from USC, Sarkisian was hired as an offensive analyst at Alabama in 2016. He coached their offense in the 2017 National Championship game. He is entering his second season as Atlanta’s offensive coordinator. Prior to his short-lived tenure as Trojans’ head coach, Sarkisian was head coach at Washington from 2009-13. He has a long history with USC, also working as an assistant under Pete Carroll from 2001-2008.last_img read more