Softball: Wisconsin falls to Oregon in NCAA tournament

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin softball team ended their NCAA women’s College World Series run Sunday, falling to Oregon for the second time that weekend.The Badgers (35-17, 11-11 Big Ten) started off their tournament run with a bang, taking down the University of Missouri (29-28, 7-16 SEC) Friday night with a 7-2 victory. This win allowed Wisconsin to continue on in the tournament and face the University of Oregon (50-6, 17-6 PAC-12) the following Saturday.Saturday’s game was a nail-biter between the Big Ten and the Pac-12, with Wisconsin challenging Oregon every step of the way. The Badgers managed to take the lead early on in the series, with a 5-2 edge over the Ducks heading into the sixth period.Softball: Wisconsin heads to NCAA tournament for sixth timeFor the sixth time in 20 years, the University of Wisconsin women’s softball team has earned a spot in the 2017 Read…The Ducks managed to come back with four runs in the final three innings, and the Badgers would win up falling 5-6. Since the World Series is a double-elimination tournament, the Badgers still had a shot at moving on in the tournament, as long as they managed to beat the University of Illinois-Chicago (39-22, 20-4 Horizon).Wisconsin had a short turn-around, with less than two hours between the two games Saturday. UIC had previously lost to Oregon Friday, and they were still fighting for their place in the tournament.With a 2-0 victory for the Badgers, Sunday’s game was scheduled, with a rematch between Oregon and Wisconsin taking place at 6 p.m. Wisconsin was hoping to find redemption in their second meeting with the Ducks, but the only thing they would find was disappointment.Softball: Errors and missed opportunities haunt Wisconsin in sweepAfter an extensive road trip, the Wisconsin Badgers softball came home to a scrappy Nebraska team, dropping their first series Read…Oregon is a team that is known for creating tremendous scoring opportunities, and once they get a scoring streak started, it is hard to stop them. The Badgers managed to hold the Ducks back Saturday, but they did not have the same luck Sunday.The Ducks started a scoring run early on in the first period, managing to take four runs from the Badgers. Oregon would continue this momentum in the fourth, when they would manage to garner another five runs in the period.The Badgers struggled to keep up, with inning after inning resulting in a scoreless scoreboard for UW. After the Ducks managed to score their ninth run in total, and the Badgers failed to score in the top of the fifth period, the game was called in Oregon’s favor.The Badgers might not have gotten the ending that they wanted, but they still managed to create some waves during their short appearance at the College World Series. If this year is indicative of anything, it is that Wisconsin is showing early signs of becoming a national powerhouse.Softball: Badgers improve on best start in program historyThe University of Wisconsin softball team continued rolling in this young season, improving to 12-2 on the year after the Read…last_img read more

If St. Louis Cardinals are stealing signs from Los Angeles Dodgers, they’re in the minority

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error In a court of law, any evidence that the St. Louis Cardinals are stealing signs from Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis would barely qualify as “circumstantial.” Yet the questions were asked, because there had to be some reason why Clayton Kershaw imploded in the seventh inning of Game 1 of the National League Division Series on Friday. Kershaw allowed eight runs in a game for only the second time in his career. The first time was a July 2012 game — against St. Louis. Adding fuel to the conspiracy theories: Kershaw had not pitched out of the stretch prior to the seventh inning Friday. Afterward, until he was lifted, there was always a runner on base.Could it be the Cardinals are stealing signs? Cardinals manager Mike Matheny played with McGwire for two seasons and managed alongside him for one more. He isn’t flattered by questions about his team stealing signs.“That would be an insult, absolutely,” Matheny said. “Our guys go about their at-bats like pros and there’s a lot of things that are going to be said from a lot of different people, and that’s all it is. It’s just rumor and right now it could just be a distraction.“We go about our business the way we go about it. Whatever’s going to be said is going to be said.”Ryu ready?Dodgers left-hander Hyun-Jin Ryu normally doesn’t throw bullpen sessions between starts, but he did Friday. The purpose, Mattingly said, was “just telling us how good he’s feeling.”Ryu also threw a 45-pitch simulated game Wednesday. He hasn’t appeared in a game since Sept. 12, when a shoulder injury ended his start against the San Francisco Giants after one inning.The Dodgers are counting on a complete recovery when Ryu starts Game 3 in St. Louis on Monday.“Everything’s pretty much on target with Hyun-Jin,” Mattingly said. “He’s feeling good so we’re pretty confident that’s going to be ready to go.”Also …Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina won’t be suspended for shoving umpire Jerry Meals during a fracas in the third inning of Game 1. According to one report, MLB was considering fining Molina, who was booed heavily before each of his at-bats Saturday. … Infielder Miguel Rojas said that he will play Winter League baseball for La Guaira of the Venezuelan League. The league begins play next week. Rojas said he will spend a week in Miami after the Dodgers’ season ends before returning to his native country. … Outfielder Joc Pederson, who spent last winter in Venezuela, said that he’ll play in the Dominican Winter League instead. He hasn’t officially signed with a team.center_img The verdict: Probably not.“All the years from being hitting coach to watching, I have one guy that’s ever relayed signs from second base — the actual sign, the actual pitch,” Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said. “Most teams, and we know it, everybody tries to pretty much give location. It’s common. … it’s just not that easy.“We know they’re trying to do it and everybody tries to do it. We’re switching signs. It’s just not that easy.”Dodgers hitting coach Mark McGwire, who spent parts of eight seasons in the Cardinals organization as a player or coach, said he played with “a few guys who leaned on tips — signs and tendencies.”“But I didn’t like it,” McGwire added. “As a hitter, you don’t want to know. Probably 98 percent of the players today don’t care to have anything like that.”last_img read more