Roy Wade, 86, Holton

first_imgRoy J. Wade, 86, of Holton passed away at 5:10am, Tuesday, January 23, 2018 at St. Andrews Health Campus in Batesville. He was born at Sullivan, Illinois on July 16, 1931 the son of Harvey and Josephine West Wade. Survivors include one son Tim (Karla) Wade of Burlington, Oklahoma; two daughters Gail Snyder of West Harrison, and Lisa (Roger) McQueen of Laurel; 7 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren; one sister Betty Friend of Anderson. He was preceded in death by his parents and his son Danny. Mr. Wade was an Army veteran of the Korean War and in civilian life was a tool & die maker. He was a former employee of Arvins in North Vernon and retired in 2009 after 36 years with Delta Faucet in Greensburg. His hobbies included building muzzle loading rifles and he enjoyed horseback riding on his farm west of Dabney. Roy attended the Shelby Christian Church. Funeral services will be held on Monday, January 29th at 11am at the Shelby Christian Church with Bro. Earl Thomas officiating. Burial will be in the Cliff Hill Cemetery in Versailles. Visitation will begin at 9am Monday and will also at the Shelby Christian Church. Memorials may be given to the Shelby Christian Church or the Cliff Hill Cemetery in care of the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles.last_img read more

Northern Colorado promotes Smiley as head basketball coach

first_imgNorthern Colorado promotes Smiley as head basketball coach Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditGREELEY, Colorado (AP) — Steve Smiley has been promoted to head men’s basketball coach at Northern Colorado, replacing Jeff Lindor, who took over at the University of Wyoming.Athletic director Darren Dunn announced the promotion Thursday night about 48 hours after naming Smiley the interim head coach following Lindor’s departure.The school plans a virtual press conference on Friday to introduce the 20th head coach in the program’s history. Lindor went 80-50 in four seasons at Northern Colorado, including three consecutive 20-plus win seasons. Smily joined Lindor’s staff in May of 2016.__More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/tag/Collegebasketball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 Associated Press March 19, 2020last_img read more

MBB : Finish line: Joseph, Jardine take the Carrier Dome floor for the last time in their careers

first_img Published on March 1, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Mark: mcooperj@syr.edu | @mark_cooperjr Facebook Twitter Google+ They try not to think about it. But amid the most successful regular season in Syracuse history, Scoop Jardine and Kris Joseph are on the verge of completing their SU careers.‘I haven’t really thought about it, I don’t like to too much,’ Joseph said Feb. 20. ‘I love Syracuse, and I’m definitely going to miss it, but I don’t really think about it too often.’There’s only one home game left. Syracuse (29-1, 16-1 Big East) completes its regular season Saturday with a matchup against Louisville (22-8, 10-7 Big East) at 4 p.m. in the Carrier Dome. The No. 2 Orange has flown through its conference slate without a ton of adversity, winning nine in a row since its only loss of the season to date. But Saturday has meaning in a historic sense for both Jardine and Joseph: This game is the culmination of their careers in front of a home crowd.Joseph tied the mark for most wins by a player at Syracuse with the Orange’s victory over Connecticut last weekend. His 113 wins match the most of anyone in an SU career, tying Sherman Douglas, Derrick Coleman and Stevie Thompson.‘I’m sure I’ve made a lot of people proud,’ Joseph said. ‘My parents, my family and that’s what’s most important to me.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTwo seasons ago, Joseph and Jardine were the first two off the bench on an Orange squad that held the best regular-season wins mark until this year. Jardine backed up Brandon Triche at point guard, but actually played more minutes than Triche and averaged 9.1 points per game.Joseph was the wing off the bench and was third on SU in scoring with 10.8 points per game.This year, on a Syracuse team that has eclipsed the regular-season success of that squad — and will likely earn a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament — they are the leaders. Dion Waiters and C.J. Fair fill the role Jardine and Joseph once held.And Jardine has established himself as a trustworthy floor general. He is third among all Big East players in assist-to-turnover ratio in conference play.‘He’s the only leader on this team — he is the leader of this team,’ head coach Jim Boeheim said after Syracuse defeated Pittsburgh Jan. 16. ‘He is the only vocal leader. He is a guy who will make plays and is not afraid to make plays — good plays.The one knock on this Syracuse team all year has been the lack of a go-to guy in clutch moments. The 2002-03 Orangemen who won the national title had Carmelo Anthony. The 2009-10 team was balanced, but Wes Johnson was the unquestioned best player.But the two SU seniors have shown the ability to carry this team in clutch moments.In Syracuse’s biggest early-season test, against Florida Dec. 2, Jardine finished with 16 points and seven assists to help the Orange to a four-point win. He scored seven of the team’s nine points in a crucial stretch late in the second half that extended Syracuse’s lead from three to eight.Joseph has quietly put together a steady season, leading Syracuse in points and minutes. He stood out against Georgetown by scoring 29 points and nailing the game-winning 3-pointer in overtime.And he scored a team-high 21 points against UConn last Saturday. With the game tied at 63 late, Joseph sliced through the center of the lane, laying the ball in over Huskies center Andre Drummond to help SU regain the lead.‘They make all the key plays for us, usually,’ Boeheim said of the pair after the UConn win.Jardine and Joseph will play in front of what should be a raucous crowd against the Cardinals. More than 30,000 tickets have been sold as of Tuesday. It will be the sixth game with an audience of 30,000-plus in the Dome during Joseph’s career and the fifth for Jardine.The only other game this season that eclipsed the 30,000 attendance mark was Feb. 11 against UConn. After that 85-67 win over UConn, Jardine said he’s just trying to cherish these moments as his career winds down.-‘I’m just playing basketball with confidence, and it’s really sad that it’s about to be over for me,’ Jardine said. ‘I appreciate everything I got here at Syracuse, from the fans perspective, even from you all.‘This is it for me, so I want to play and leave everything on the floor, on Jim Boeheim Court. Every game I play here, I’m going to do that.’mcooperj@syr.educenter_img Commentslast_img read more

Brooke Alexander searches for role she was recruited for

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 21, 2019 at 1:30 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew In the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center, Brooke Alexander started to laugh as her father’s shot sunk through the basket. For once, she was rebounding for Mike. She grabbed the bouncing ball, but turned to launch a 3-pointer of her own while her mother and grandparents snapped photos from the right corner. It was Nov. 23, one day before Syracuse’s game against then-No. 1 Oregon and less than an hour before the Orange’s walk-through.Mike swung the ball back to his daughter, and she made a second. He remained underneath the basket and continued to rebound as Alexander’s streak reached three, then five, then 10. “Her form’s probably the best it’s ever been,” he recalled thinking.It was the form that Alexander had developed by jumping on trampolines and off of bleachers, allowing her to mesh elevation and optimal release points into a true jump shot — something she called a rarity in women’s basketball. The stroke that caused Syracuse assistant coach Vonn Read to email Alexander through the transfer portal last April, starting a process that revolved around one point: A vision of her as the next Miranda Drummond, SU’s all-time leading 3-point shooter.But a day after shooting around with her family, she played only two minutes against Oregon and Syracuse’s dream of Alexander having a Drummond-type impact continued to fade. She bought into Read’s initial pitch, yet has struggled to earn minutes off the bench for the Orange (5-4) — let alone the starting lineup.“I’ve got to do a better job of getting Brooke minutes to give her a chance to contribute like I know she can,” head coach Quentin Hillsman said two weeks ago. Zero starts, 43 total minutes and just two 3-pointers indicate the graduate transfer’s lack of impact in a Syracuse frontcourt filled with returning depth from last year.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse was supposed to be the final stop where everything came together, the ending of a college journey that began at Liberty and pivoted to the University of Texas Arlington. There, Alexander had completed her transition from a pass-first to shoot-first player and ranked sixth in the Sun Belt Conference for 3-point shooting percentage last season.Growing up, she was the player that learned flashy passes early and used accelerated court vision to execute them over her head and behind her back in middle school. Alexander learned, though, that wasn’t what colleges looked for. They wanted to know if she could shoot, if she could turn defensive rebounds into points.When training with Carlos Ratliff of the West Texas Basketball Academy throughout middle school, Alexander was taught a shot with three different release points: a low one for far 3-pointers, a higher shot for launching over players and a regular jump shot that depended on the right blend of elevation and finish. Ratliff had her jump from the bleachers onto the ground to practice the release point, and on the trampoline to imitate the lift a proper jumper needed.“A lot of women’s basketball is either layups or 3s,” Alexander said. “Mid-range is something that I felt separated me.”But it still took time to initially crack the Liberty rotation. The Flames already had a senior starting guard, and Alexander resorted to rebounds, blocks and assists for her contributions. As the season progressed, Alexander became indispensable during Patriot League play, making her first start against Winthrop on Jan. 16 and leading Liberty to a 13-3 record when in the primary rotation. Head coach Carey Green said they would’ve won their conference-deciding finale had Alexander not caught the flu.A transfer closer to her home of Frisco, Texas rekindled a relationship with UTA head coach Krista Gerlich that had started when she was first recruited out of high school. But Alexander quickly discovered her offensive strengths didn’t mesh with many mid-major approaches. UTA relied on slashing to the paint with a small-ball offense that featured a 6-foot-1 guard at center last season. Alexander’s 3-point and jump shot reliance was a secondary option both years.In two seasons at University of Texas Arlington Alexander averaged 5.2 points, 1.4 assists and 2.0 rebounds per game.Corey Henry Photo EditorThe UTA staff moved Alexander to small forward, a change from her previous ball-handling roles, Mike said. She was the Mavericks’ best 3-point shooter and took most of her shots from beyond the arc, but only averaged 7.4 points per game — fourth on the team. Ratliff called Alexander’s three years in Arlington “wasted.”“She walked into a team at UTA where the coach had decided that they wanted to play a certain way and it was ‘put an odd-man out,’” Ratliff said. “Brooke was the odd-man out.”Gerlich and associate head coach Talby Justus both declined interviews for this story.That’s why Syracuse stuck out to Alexander as a grad transfer location: She would finally have the freedom to shoot in Hillsman’s offense. If she wasn’t open, she could double pump-fake and shoot anyway, Hillsman said. And if she didn’t shoot, she’d sit on the bench. Alexander could spot up for star point guard Tiana Mangakahia, she imagined at the time, though Mangakahia has since been ruled out for the season as she recovers from breast cancer treatment.But even Hillsman’s system proved to have limited shooting opportunities for Alexander, who averages a meager 1.4 points per game through 10 contests. Other guards and forwards have leapfrogged Alexander on the depth chart, and she’s mostly used to give rotation players short breathers or in the waning minutes of a blowout.“(Hillsman) just really values my 3-point shot and he wants me to look for that the most and that’s something that I understand,” Alexander said. “In a role I understood coming in here.”With under five minutes remaining in Syracuse’s Dec. 8 win against UMBC, Alexander circled around the 3-point arc as a screen moved aside one final defender. Alexander’s hand thrust in the air, waiting for an Alisha Lewis pass. It was a set play designed for Alexander off an inbounds pass, one intended to create an open 3-pointer for her. And it worked.Alexander released the ball with the closest Retriever defender in the paint, but it spun out of the rim. Alexander’s second missed 3 since she checked in a minute earlier lengthened the gap between her last made 3 – the season opener against Ohio. She still hasn’t sunk one since then.“I’ve never had a coach that if you miss 100 shots in a row and you hesitate on the 101st shot, then he’s gonna take you out,” Alexander said. “Not because you missed the 100 shots, because you hesitated on the 101st shot.”That’s why when Lewis dribbled down the court three minutes later after a UMBC make, Alexander ran parallel to the point guard and stuck both her hands out. She took another open shot, and it bounced out again. Her head dropped briefly, but then perked up.Alexander’s form was there, and that was a start. So as Elemy Colome corralled the offensive rebound, Alexander set her feet again, extended her hands and waited for a pass.“I still believe in that,” Alexander said about the vision of her in Drummond’s role. “I still think that’ll happen for me.” Commentslast_img read more

Football During a Pandemic Then and Now

first_imgAt the time, the Golden Tornadoes, played six games at Grant Field that season, coached by John Heisman of Heisman Trophy fame. Georgia Tech’s team, more commonly known as the Yellow Jackets, was coming off a 1917 season where they were generally regarded as the nation’s best.The photo is generating buzz online as football fans wonder what a 2020 season will look like with the coronavirus pandemic spreading nationwide. By most indications, the season will get underway as scheduled, for most teams, in early September. The NCAA gave teams and players the green light to begin workouts next month, though each school will decide what’s appropriate for its students. Precautionary measures including social distancing and protective face masks could be a part of the plan if and when stadiums open to the public. Whether or not the fans come is another matter. Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross is optimistic that the 2020 NFL season will go on as planned amid the coronavirus pandemic, and his current plan is that it will be with fans in the stands at Hard Rock Stadium.“I think there definitely will be a football season this year,” Ross said Tuesday during an interview with CNBC. “Real question is, will there be fans in the stadium? Right now — today — we’re planning to have fans in the stadium.”The NFL hasn’t made any firm decisions on whether to allow fans into stadiums during the 2020 season, but the league released its schedule earlier this month and plans to play its full 16-game slate on time, starting Sept. 10.“We all miss our sports,” Ross said. “The NFL, I think, will be ready to go. I know we’re all looking forward to it. I know I am.”But, lest history repeats itself. The Georgia Tech Alumni association posted a photo taken in its school’s stands in 1918 in which fans are wearing masks to protect themselves and each other from the Spanish Flu pandemic, which killed 650,000 Americans. The players wore helmets, not masks.In 1918 Georgia Tech played almost a complete football schedule during the Spanish Flu outbreak that killed more than 675,000 in the US. Coached by the legendary John Heisman, The Golden Tornadoes, played six games at Grant Field. :Andy McNeil, PP 01. https://t.co/KJYbe9onFE pic.twitter.com/Q7UPEMahf8— Georgia Tech Alumni (@gtalumni) May 13, 2020last_img read more

Thomas’ mom, grandma have to root from prison

first_imgDenver Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas talks with reporters during a news conference Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, in Jersey City, N.J. The Broncos are scheduled to play the Seattle Seahawks in the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game Sunday, Feb. 2, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo)JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) – Demaryius Thomas’ mother and grandmother will cheer for the Broncos receiver around the prison TV Sunday, both wearing No. 88 jerseys they crafted with strips of tape.The two women have never seen Thomas play in person. He was 11 when police burst through the door of their home in Montrose, Ga., and arrested both on drug charges in 1999. Police allowed Katina Smith to walk her son and his two younger sisters to the school bus one last time.Now she’s at a minimum-security prison in Florida, sentenced to 20 years. Her mother, Minnie Pearl Thomas, who had two previous drug convictions, received two life sentences with the possibility for parole after 40 years.Smith could have gotten a lighter sentence by testifying against her mother, but she refused.They’ll watch Thomas play in his first Super Bowl Sunday, when he will be matched against Seahawks star cornerback Richard Sherman for much of the game.“I think that drives me more to know that they’re there and they’re watching me,” Thomas said. “I try to go out there and play my best because they’re going to talk about it to the people in the jailhouse.”Thomas’ father was serving in the Army and stationed in Kuwait when his mother and grandmother were arrested. He went to live with an aunt and uncle, Shirley and James Brown, a Baptist minister who lived six miles away.Thomas, called “Bay-Bay” by his family, started working as an usher at the church and attending Bible study after track and basketball practices.“Once I moved in with him, I told him I wanted to do something to stay off the streets and stay out of trouble, so I tried football,” Thomas said. “And it worked out for me.”Thomas played at Georgia Tech and was a first-round pick by Denver in 2010. Injuries slowed him down until his 80-yard catch from Tim Tebow in overtime beat Pittsburgh in the playoffs.Two months later, Peyton Manning came to Denver and Thomas has flourished ever since, catching 204 passes for 3,089 yards and 27 touchdowns over the last two years.The 6-foot-3, 230-pound deep threat has an uncanny mix of size, speed and strength – Wes Welker laughed about his “Triple-XL gloves.” Dominique Rodgers Cromartie said he lost a bet when he challenged Thomas to throw a ball 60 yards from his knees “and he just flicked it!”Yet, Thomas is the antithesis of the prima donna wide receiver who demands passes and attention. He never says a thing to the cornerback covering him, much less talk trash.It goes back to the values instilled in him by his aunt and uncle, Thomas said.“It made me a stronger man and a better man just being in that atmosphere, working harder, knowing that nothing’s going to be easy.”Brown said it wasn’t easy taking in another child with three kids of his own and just one paycheck, but he found ways to make it all work. He also found the money to keep Thomas involved in sports.“I truly believe his Christian upbringing and sports, playing basketball and football, contributed to him releasing a lot of the anger and anxiety that he had in him,” Brown said. “He left it on the basketball court, on the football field so it didn’t get bottled up in him.”Thomas led all NFL receivers in TD receptions (14) and yards after the catch (718) this season while grabbing 92 passes for 1,430 yards. In the playoffs, he has 15 receptions for 188 yards and TDs in both of Denver’s wins.“Watching him mature as a football player and as a person has been tremendous,” teammate Eric Decker said. “The guy has so much talent.”Brown says he just wanted Thomas to grow up to be a good man, never thinking he would become a star.“The blessing has been just seeing the product of how we took this young man who was lost – well, trying to find his way – and we were able to nurture him and give him what he needed,” said Brown, who will be in the stands Sunday. “When Demaryius was staying with us, I never dreamed that he would be in the Super Bowl. I just wanted to make sure the anger in him didn’t send him down the wrong path like his mama and grand-mama had gone down.”___AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org___Follow AP Pro Football Writer Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapletonlast_img read more

Joint Animal Services: Collie Mix Dog and Silver Tabby Cat Are…

first_imgDogHello, I am so excited to tell you about me! I am a 1-2 year old male Collie mix! I love to play! I love to run! I love to jump! I especially love to play fetch! I am very playful and full of energy! I am smart and I even know sit! I might need some time and patients to get past my excitement, but it’s worth it to see my loving side! I came into Joint Animal Services as a stray and I can’t wait to find my forever home! My # is 80011! You should totally come down and meet me! I would love to meet you! You could call 360-352-2510 to get info also! Thanks for reading about me! Facebook6Tweet0Pin1Submitted By: Joint Animal ServicesCatHello, I am a male grey and silver tabby cat. I am a fun cat to have around. I enjoy people and am always ready to be petted or to play. I am very handsome with grey and silver strips and bright yellow eyes. I am very friendly and look forward to sharing my love and fun with my family. I came into Joint Animal Services as a stray and am looking for a forever home. Come down and meet me or call 360-352-2510 to get more info about me. My # is 79984.last_img read more