Bahamian Cultural Icon passes

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, July 6th 2017 – Nassau – Bahamas has now lost a cultural icon. Cleophas Adderley, founder and director of The Bahamas National Youth Choir (BNYC) passed away yesterday after a long illness. Adderley was 62 years of age and had spent most of life showcasing Bahamian talent of the arts worldwide. He was a well-known musician and composer, and led the National Choir to perform for the likes of Queen Elizabeth II, the late Nelson Mandela, the late Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder and so many others.Adderley also recently received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the ALIV Bahamian Icon Awards in June. Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Michel Pintard expressed his condolences to the family and said, ““He was a unique and iconic cultural character who dedicated his life to music and to the people of the Bahamas. His life experience led him to be involved in many facets of the community where he touched the lives of thousands through music.”Adderley started the BNYC in 1983 as part of Bahamas 10th Independence anniversary celebrations. Over the past three decades he had trained hundreds of young people, and led the BNYC to win and participate in numerous competitions both locally and internationally.Adderley also composed “Our Boys”, the first Bahamian grand opera, which was also the first opera to have been written and performed in the English-speaking Caribbean; and the composer of the first Bahamian Concert Mass, “Missa Caribe”.Adderley was the son of former Member of Parliament, late Cleophas E. Adderley and the grandson of the later R. M Bailey.Adderley will be remembered by many as a “distinguished” and “talented” scholar and musician and will be especially missed by his National Youth Choir family.Story By: Kay-Marie Fletcher#MagneticMediaNews Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Related Items:#magneticmedianews ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

News Report cites Bahamas refugee laws lacking UNHCR to help

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, August 17, 2017 – Nassau – The United Nations Human Rights Commission is telling a local newspaper that Bahamas laws are lagging when it comes to how legitimate refugees are handled; and it is leading to outrageously lengthy detention times for those who rightly fall into the category.   The Tribune reports that this is a twenty year old problem, and despite the fact that The Bahamas has signed onto the conventions since 1993, which would necessitate these laws, the legal framework is simply absent.UNHCR Assistant Protection Officer, Deneisha Moss Balboni said, “…if you look at the people who are admitted into a process and have access to UNHCR, there are still ongoing gaps because there are no guarantees under Bahamian law for people who are recognized as refugees.    So things that are protections that are provided for in the refugee convention that people don’t have access to, for example the right to be issued ID documents and whatever necessary residence permit to facilitate a refugee’s continued stay in a country of asylum, or a right to gainful employment so they could become self-sufficient or the right to access basic healthcare and education.”No law it seems, equates to no respect for the right of that UNHCR refugee and for 12 detainees at the Carmichael Road detention center, who were recently released it meant being held for years and years and years without any criminal charge.   Bascially, local laws should allow the proven refugee to have freedom of movement.Moss Balboni reports that the Government is prepared to fill the legislative gaps with some formal mechanisms, adding that as an advisor for the United Nations, her outlook for the future is bright as The Bahamas aims to get this right.#MagneticMediaNewsPhoto Credit: The Tribunelast_img read more

AARP Rolls Out Social Monetization

first_img“This is an extension of a very successful program that has been running on AARP.org,” says Peter Zeuschner, who leads digital sales for the association. “In December we clocked in our 1 millionth follower so it became a logical extension of taking a successful program that lived in our site and moving it over to Facebook with this dedicated ‘Hot Deals’ tab where our Facebook followers are looking for discounts.”Zeuschner says that the association’s 37 million members own about 75 percent of the nation’s wealth, making them an attractive demographic for sponsors looking to promote deals. He says about 33 percent of Facebook’s global audience falls into the 50-plus category, making the space a natural place to extend the offers. The deals rolled out on March 1 and AARP has seen between two and four percent of its fans clicking through since the program was introduced.“The ‘Hot Deals’ program is a package—we’ve bundled all of our highest performing assets with this, like banner ads, interstitials, dedicated landing pages and now this Facebook tab together under one price point,” he says. “It’s priced per-month for a 30-day time period and this is considered our premier package. We have a very engaged audience that’s supported our business model—we’ve experienced a revenue growth of 35 to 50 percent for the last five years because our members are so engaged.”In addition to having a dedicated Facebook tab the social initiative will be promoted on AARP.org, through an e-newsletter and in the association’s magazine.“Above everything else AARP is a membership and social impact organization,” he says. “The key to this is member value. Our members are looking for quality discounts and great deals, so this is an opportunity for us to provide them with one place to go to get these great advertising bargains by taking advantage of the growth of Facebook.” Stay updated on the latest FOLIO: news, follow us on Facebook & Twitter! AARP, the association for those aged 50-plus and publisher of the largest circulation magazine in the country, is taking advantage of Facebook to not only reach its core membership, but to offer advertisers integrated ad buys as well.The new program known as “Hot Deals” is designed for advertisers to reach the 50-plus audience through a dedicated Facebook tab that offers money-saving opportunities—the program promotes or tests timely offers that generate sales for new and repeat advertisers. AARP estimates that 75 percent of all of its members sign up looking for discounts, though these Facebook offers are not limited to members only. The deals are housed on the “Advertising Section” of AARP’s Facebook page—sponsors can provide up to 140 characters describing the offer and product benefit, a visual and a click-through URL to offer redemption on a brand’s website. Consumers also have the option of sharing the deal on Facebook or via email with their friends.last_img read more

Incentives Used to Promote Renewable Energy Development Could Benefit Small Reactors Report

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Federal incentives to encourage private sector investment in the deployment of small modular reactors could generate a higher payoff than the government effort over the past decade to promote the use of renewable energy, according to a new Department of Energy report. Examination of Federal Financial Assistance in the Renewable Energy Market, co-authored by Kutak Rock and Scully Capital, estimates that $10 billion in incentives would be needed to deploy 6 gigawatts of small modular reactor capacity by 2035. The cost of such an investment on a per kilowatt hour basis would be only one-third as expensive as the federal government’s initiative to stimulate the development of solar plants and wind farms. From 2005-2015 the government provided $51.2 billion in mandates, tax incentives, loans and research grants to stimulate solar and wind production. About 90 percent of that investment came in the form of subsidies, which included investment and production tax credits. As a result, solar capacity grew by nearly 78,000 megawatts and wind capacity added more than 446,000 megawatts over that period.Photo by Idaho National Laboratorylast_img read more

Air India hits back after being ranked thirdworst performing airline

first_imgAir India aircraft stand on the tarmac at the airport in Mumbai September 27, 2009.Reuters fileA day after a data service company FlightStats published a report listing Air India as the ‘third worst performing airline’ in the world for on-time performance, the state-owned carrier has hit back. “We totally  disagree with the report published by FlightStats about AI. Initially, it seems that the report is fabricated so AI management will investigate the report till the end,” AI’s spokesperson was quoted as saying by the Hindustan Times. Also read: Air India deemed ‘third-worst’ airline in the world, Israel’s EI AI the worstThe report comes at a time when Air India is already struggling to turn a profit despite being on a bailout package of Rs 10,000 crore. The nine other airlines that have been deemed worst include: El Al Israel Airlines (1), Icelandair (2), Philippine Airlines (4), Asiana Airlines (5), China Eastern Airlines (6), Hong Kong Airlines (7), Air China (8), Korean Air (9) and Hainan Airlines (10).According to the website, the company, FlightStats, recognises airlines around the world that have the best on-time performance by keeping tabs on delays and cancellation patterns. Jim Hetzel, vice-president of aviation and distribution at FlightStats, told the agency that compiling the list is a herculean task. “We stitch data together from 500 different sources”.The company parses flight-tracking and positional services, airport runway times, radar services, airline data records among various other sources to come up with the lists, it was earlier reported. The list pegged KLM Royal Dutch Airlines as the “best on-time performing airline”.In November, Air India had recorded a market share of 12.9 percent. Given below is the letter Air India sent out to FlightStats:  Twitter/AirIndialast_img read more

Nanodisk Codes

first_imgPhysical binary codes formed by nanodisks carved out of nanorods. Image courtesy Chad Mirkin. Researchers at Northwestern University have devised a way to use billionth-of-a-meter-sized disks to create codes that could be used to encrypt information, serve as biological labels, and even tag and track goods and personnel. Citation: Nanodisk Codes (2007, December 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-12-nanodisk-codes.html Explore further Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure The nanodisks can form a physical pattern, similar in concept to a barcode, as well as a spectroscopic code, meaning it can exhibit a specific, unique response to electromagnetic radiation, or light, depending on the type of molecule (or molecules) attached to the disks—in other words, how the disks are “functionalized.”Nanostructures can be ideal for encoding. Their small size allows them to be hidden easily in a variety of materials and objects, and scientists’ ability to easily tailor their physical and chemical properties makes it possible to design nanostructures for specific coding functions.In a paper describing this work, published in a recent edition of Nano Letters, the researchers, led by Northeastern chemist Chad Mirkin, describe how the nanodisks can form physical binary codes. The group started with nanorods made of gold and nickel and, using a method they developed, carved disks out of each rod. The disks are created in twos, with up to five pairs created per rod.Each of the five disk-pair locations along the rod can correspond to a “0” or a “1,” depending on whether that location is occupied by a disk pair. For example, if only one disk pair is present, and it is situated at the third location, that code is read as 00100. If two disk pairs are present, at the fourth and fifth locations, the code is 00011.“This is a rapid, low cost way of making many unique nanostructures that can identified and read based upon high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques,” Mirkin said to PhysOrg.com. “It’s a beautiful example of how the ability to shape and control the size and surface composition of a nanostructure can translate into significant technological advantages.”The group has made nanodisk arrays as long as 12 micrometers (millionths of a meter), which can support as many as 10 disk pairs, yielding 287 physical nanodisk codes.The researchers increased the codes’ usefulness by functionalizing them with a class of dye molecules called chromophores. This makes the codes spectroscopically active, allowing each to emit a unique light spectrum when illuminated by an exterior light source, typically a laser beam.Due to the physical and spectroscopic codes they can exhibit, the nanodisks are particularly suited for biological tagging, a method of tracking and detecting individual biological materials, such as DNA. The researchers proved this by attaching pieces of single-stranded DNA to the surfaces of the nanodisks in a 11011 code. Each of these strands was complementary to half of a “target” DNA strand—the strand being tagged. The other half of the target strand was complementary to a “reporter” strand, rendered spectroscopically active with dye. The overall structure formed a three-strand “sandwich,” with the target strand in the middle.The group also created a similar sandwich structure using a different reporter strand and a 10101 code, and then mixed the two samples. They were able to successfully detect and distinguish between the unique spectrums emitted by both reporter molecules.Citation: Nano Lett., 7 (12), 3849-3853, 2007Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Gas dynamics in a nearby protostellar binary system studied with ALMA

first_img Protostars as single objects or existing in binary systems are important for astronomers to study the mechanisms of star formation. In some protostellar binaries a peculiar “bridge” of material is clearly visible, which connects the recently formed components. This remnant material could be the key to better understand how stars form and evolve.IRAS 16293−2422 (or IRAS 16293 for short) exhibits such a bridge connection between the two companions. It is a young, Class 0 protostellar system located some 400 light years away in the Ophiuchus cloud complex, consisting of two protostars, designated IRAS 16293A and IRAS 16293B, separated by about 636 AU from each other.Besides an arc of dust and gas connecting the sources, previous observations of IRAS 16293 have also found outflows from the object “A.” These features make it a very complex system, where the observed gas line emission can only be explained by a combination of multiple physical components.In order to gather more information about on this subject, which could provide essential hints into the nature and evolutionary status of IRAS 16293, a group of astronomers led by Matthijs H.D. van der Wiel of the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), has employed ALMA to observe this binary.The observations were conducted between June 2014 and May 2015, as part of the ALMA-PILS spectral imaging survey. From the data provided by the survey, the researchers chose molecular gas line transitions of CO, H2CO, HCN, CS, SiO, and C2H and used them to kinematics, density, and temperature in IRAS 16293.Analyzing the results, the astronomers found that the kinematically quiescent bridge of dust and gas spanning between IRAS 16293A and IRAS 16293B has a density within the range between 40,000 and 30 million cm-3, and is stable against radial collapse. The data suggest that this bridge is a remnant substructure of a filamentary circumbinary envelope that has undergone turbulent fragmentation to form both protostellar sources.Moreover, the observations uncovered the presence of a separate, straight filament seemingly connected to IRAS 16293B and seen only in C2H, with a flat kinematic signature. This structure stretches straight across source “B” at position angle of about 15 degrees. The researchers noted that the properties of this filament indicate that its origin in outflow activity of IRAS 16293B can be ruled out. Taking into account the results from ALMA observations and also from previous studies, the authors of the paper found that IRAS 16293B may be in an earlier evolutionary stage than the source “A.” In general, they concluded that IRAS 16293 may represent a particular stage in the evolution of binaries, a phase which many other protostars may go through at one point in their evolution. An international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to investigate gas dynamics in a nearby young protostellar binary known as IRAS 16293−2422. Results of the observations, presented in a paper published March 29, provide more insights into the evolutionary status of this system. Illustration of physical components surrounding and bridging protostars A and B in the IRAS 16293 system, and outflows emanating from IRAS 16293A. Credit: Van der Wiel et al., 2019. Citation: Gas dynamics in a nearby protostellar binary system studied with ALMA (2019, April 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-gas-dynamics-nearby-protostellar-binary.html ALMA finds ingredient of life around infant Sun-like stars More information: M. H. D. van der Wiel et al. The ALMA-PILS survey: Gas dynamics in IRAS 16293−2422 and the connection between its two. Astrophysics of Galaxies (astro-ph.GA). protostarsarxiv.org/abs/1903.12606 Explore further © 2019 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more