Medical clowning courses help students, patients

first_imgOne can often find professor Caitlyn Conlin working in a hospital -— but not in a traditional medical profession. Conlin, sporting a red nose, interacts with young hospitalized patients through the art of medical clowning, which is targeted at transforming the experience of hospitalization for patients. “If someone wants to talk about their trip to Alaska, the clown will play with that,” Conlin said. “If someone wants to talk about monsters and zombies, then the clown will do that. So the content is different, but the play is still the same.” This story has been updated for clarity. “I started interacting with different objects in the hallway around the room and pretending that they were alive,” Conlin said. “Doctors and nurses were passing through the hallway,  and I turned it into a parade … a beautiful, amazing parade.” School of Dramatic Arts professors Zachary Steel (left) and Caitlyn Conlin (right) teach courses on medical clowning. (Photo courtesy of Caitlyn Conlin) “The philosophy of clowning … when you  participate in a medical clowning class, you do exercises that allow you to tap into a certain state of being that is completely free and has unlimited imagination,” Conlin said. Steel said that medical clowning may also give hope to patients’ families. On one visit with unconscious patient, Conlin and Steel said they were able to change the mother’s experience at the hospital. “It’s really not about ‘Oh, look at me, I’m a clown on stage,’” Chow said. “It’s like, ‘OK, I’m here for you.’” According to Conlin, by interacting with the patients actively, the medical clowns are able to gain trust from patients and create beautiful memories with them. She improvised a performance to engage with a shy boy. Conlin also said medical clowning is all about improvisation and intimate interaction with patients and the environment. Conlin said the magic of medical clowning lies not only in healing patients but also in giving hope to patients’ families. When Conlin and Steel met with an unconscious patient, the nurse said there was not much the medical clowns could do. However, the patient’s mother called them in, and they said they were able to successfully implore the mother’s experience in the hospital. The course explores the philosophies of medical clowning and offers students opportunities to perform in hospitals. Steel said that in the class, students learn the principles of theatrical clowning to reveal the “most innocent and pure” parts of themselves to pursue joy and take this newly discovered joy to hospitals.  center_img “It’s very meaningful to the mother to have someone treating her daughter with the same feeling of aliveness… That was really important for the mother to keep the hope going,” Conlin said.       However, Steel said that surprises are needed sometimes because they want to promote optimism in hospital environments. They want patients to feel comfortable with their surroundings. Conlin said that children and adult patients have different responses to medical clowns. She said adults are at first more hesitant to open themselves to more creative outlets. But once patients have experienced medical clowning, Conlin said they realize the clowns can tailor the experience to their age and topics they want to discuss. As opposed to other types of clowning, medical clowning aims to build one-to-one immersive interactions with patients, rather than facing a large audience. Christina Chow, a senior majoring in biological sciences who is currently taking Steel and Conlin’s class. “You are only doing what you are given the permission to do by the patients,” Steel said. There are rules to medical clowning because of the environment that the hospitals provide. Steel said a medical clown should avoid speaking loudly and remember to be respectful to their surroundings. Conlin said she accompanied the boy on his way to the operation room and made him feel comfortable. Conlin and professor Zachary Steel from the School of Dramatic Arts teach the medical clowning courses. Along with their instructors, students are able to go to hospitals to apply what they have learned in class and build long-term bonds with patients. “When I go into the hospital, I have nothing planned,” she said. “I mean, I do have songs that I know that I’ll sing sometime when singing comes up, but I don’t plan what I’m going to sing. A lot of times I don’t plan what song I’m going to sing and a lot of times I make up songs … You are pushing yourself into unknown places and a sort of magic starts to happen in the moment. ” last_img read more

Men’s tennis returns to the court with two home wins

first_imgThe Trojans continue at home tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. with a double header against UC Davis and the University of San Francisco. In the opening match, USC will look to overwhelm a young UC Davis team that has only one upperclassman. It will, however, be a tricky matchup, as the young Aggies have a 6-0 record heading into tomorrow’s matches. USF comes in with an undefeated record as well, although they have only played one match. USC will look to best its result against the Dons last year, when USC won 5-2. The USC men’s tennis team continued its recent success in the ITA Weekend Kickoff Tournament last weekend. After returning from a trip to Australia, the No. 5 Trojans defeated Cal Poly Saturday and defeated UC Santa Barbara in the final on Sunday. USC went up against Cal Poly in the first round and swept them 4-0. All three Trojan pairings started off slow in doubles, with sophomore Daniel Cuckierman and freshman Bradley Frye losing their match 4-6. Juniors Brandon Holt and Riley Smith were able to overcome their slow start, however, and came up with a 6-4 victory. The deciding doubles match came down to the wire, but seniors Laurens Verboven and Jack Jaede were able to clinch the set with a 7-5 win. Holt and Cuckierman both played out their matches and in the end, Holt won his match 7-6, 4-6, 6-4. Cuckierman was the last to finish with a hard fought 6-3, 5-7, 6-4 win. At the end of the day, USC won both of its matches over the weekend and qualified for its 11th consecutive ITA National Indoor Championship, which will be held in Chicago on Feb 15. Smith secured a quick victory once again in singles with a 6-2, 6-2 win. Similarly, freshman Mor Bulis won 6-3, 6-2 in his match. Santa Barbara was able to get 1 point back, as Verboven lost 6-2, 6-3. After Holt and Cuckierman split sets in their matches, all of the attention turned to freshman Jake Sands to clinch USC’s win. Sands stood strong under the pressure and pulled out a gritty 6-4, 6-4 win to give USC the tournament.   The singles matches were much more straightforward, as the Trojans got three straight set wins from Holt (6-4, 6-0), Smith (6-3, 6-2) and Cuckierman (6-1, 7-5). This completed the sweep and secured USC’s place in the championship match on Sunday against the Gauchos.center_img The doubles on Sunday against Santa Barbara proved to be much easier for the Trojans. Holt and Smith dominated with a 6-1 victory, which Cuckierman and Frye followed up with a straightforward 6-2 win. With the doubles point easily secured, the match turned to singles. “As a team, we were all just ready to go, and we are excited for this year,” Smith said. “I think we are going to compete our butts off. I think we really have a chance to just do something special this year. Tournament is nothing different to us, and we are just going to go out there and compete.” The good news continues to come in for the Trojans. It was announced Tuesday that Holt won Pac-12 Player of the Week honors following his undefeated record this past weekend. Women’s tennis junior Angela Kulikov also won the same honor this week, marking the first time since 2015 that USC tennis has had a men’s and women’s player take Player of the Week honors in the same week. Junior Brandon Holt won Pac-12 Player of the Week honors after snagging two doubles and two singles victories in the ITA Kickoff Weekend. It is the second time in his career Holt has earned the honor. (Emily Smith/Daily Trojan)last_img read more

Betway offers 3/1 on Crouch celebrating 100th goal with Robot

first_img Submit StumbleUpon Share Share Related Articles Real Betis selects Betway as its official shirt sponsor August 10, 2020 ESI Digital – No Drama Please… Esports growth should be treated as business as usual  August 20, 2020 Betway and Dafabet grow La Liga sponsorship portfolios August 14, 2020 Betway has offered odds of 3/1 on Peter Crouch reproducing the iconic ‘Robot’ dance celebration when he scores his 100th Premier League goal.Last week, the 42-times capped England international scored his 36th Premier League goal for Stoke City, and his 99th in total, to move just one short of joining the illustrious 100 club.More than a decade on from debuting the ‘Robot’ in an England friendly against Hungary, Crouch is 3/1 to repeat the celebration when he reaches the landmark.The striker is 100/30 to score the goal against Manchester United tomorrow, 5/1 to get it against Everton on 1 February and 2/1 to draw a blank in Stoke’s next five league games. He is 6/4 to reach 100 with his 49th headed goal.Alan Alger, PR Manager for Betway, said: “It seems like Peter Crouch has been around forever and his determination to play at the top level deserves to be rewarded. He’s clearly a tricky man to defend against and poses an obvious aerial threat.“At 6/4, we think the big man is most likely to score his 100th Premier League goal with his head. To mark the occasion, he could well treat us all to a rendition of the robot, which we price up at 3/1.”In addition to the 36 Premier League goals for Stoke, Crouch has scored 22 for Liverpool, 12 for Tottenham, 12 for Southampton, 11 for Portsmouth and six for Aston Villa.last_img read more