Third avian flu case verified in area of possible Indonesian cluster

first_imgAug 21, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A third human case of H5N1 avian influenza has been confirmed in a remote part of Indonesia where a number of suspected cases are being investigated, but most of the cases probably resulted from exposure to sick poultry, the World Health Organization (WHO) said today.The confirmed case was in a 35-year-old woman from the subdistrict of Cikelet in West Java province who died shortly after she was hospitalized Aug 17, the WHO said.  She is the 46thIndonesian to die of the illness, out of 59 confirmed cases, by the WHO’s count. An Aug 20 Agence France-Presse (AFP) report identified the woman as Euis Lina.Multiple cases in close proximity raise the possibility of human-to-human transmission.  The disease was confirmed in two other people from Cikelet in the past week: a 9-year-old girl who died Aug 15 and a 17-year-old boy who is still alive.Three other people in the area died previously of suspected avian flu but were buried without being tested, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP). One of them was the daughter of Euis Lina, said Indonesian Health Minister Siti Fadilah Supari, as quoted by AFP.Sixteen other people in the area have been tested for the virus, AFP reported today. Their initial results were negative, but the tests are being repeated, an Indonesian official told AFP.WHO and Indonesian experts have been investigating in the Cikelet area since Aug 17, according to AFP. The WHO said investigators think the human cases are related to poultry outbreaks that began in late June.Cikelet encompasses about 20 isolated hamlets of around 200 to 400 people each, situated in a basin surrounded by steep mountains and accessed only by rocky, winding paths, the WHO said.  People in the area have little access to healthcare and often die of endemic diseases such as malaria.No mass poultry deaths are known to have occurred in the area before late June, when some chickens were bought from an outside market and added to local flocks, the WHO said. Large numbers of chickens began dying shortly afterward in an outbreak that continued through July and the first week of August.’High-risk behaviors’ cited”As the population had no experience with this disease, high-risk behaviors commonly occurred during the disposal of carcasses or the preparation of sick or dead birds for consumption,” the agency said. “These exposures are, at present, thought to be the source of infection for most confirmed or suspected cases.”Some people in the area died of respiratory illnesses in late July and early August, but no samples were taken and medical records are generally poor, the WHO said, adding, “Though some of these undiagnosed deaths occurred in family members of confirmed cases, the investigation has found no evidence of human-to-human transmission and no evidence that the virus is spreading more easily from birds to humans.”The Cikelet situation comes about 3 months after seven confirmed avian flu cases and one probable case occurred in an extended family in the Indonesian province of North Sumatra. That cluster brought the first laboratory-confirmed instance of human-to-human transmission and the first three-person chain of cases. However, the WHO concluded that the disease did not spread outside the family.Indonesian officials today played down the likelihood of a case cluster with person-to-person transmission in Cikelet, according to the AFP report.I Nyoman Kandun told AFP that the cases couldn’t be classified as a cluster at this point because the patients lived too far apart to have come into contact.The 17-year-old boy who survived the illness had contact with a cousin who was one of the three people who died of possible avian flu without being tested. The WHO said previously that person-to-person transmission was highly unlikely in that instance because both patients were exposed to sick chickens and both got sick the same day, whereas there would have been a delay if one had been infected by the other.Another suspected case-patient from the Cikelet area, a 4-year-old girl, was removed from a hospital today by family members against the advice of doctors, the Jakarta Post reported. After she showed some improvement, the family decided to treat her at home, though her test results were still awaited, said a spokesman for Dr. Slamet General Hospital in Garut regency.The story described the girl as one of 11 people from Cikelet with suspected or confirmed avian flu.The latest confirmed case raises the WHO’s global avian flu toll to 240 cases with 141 deaths. That includes 95 cases so far this year, equal to the total for all of 2005. Sixty-four people have died of the illness so far this year, compared with 41 for all of last year.FAO lists Balkans as high-risk areaIn other developments, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said today that the spread of avian flu among poultry has slowed in most countries, but warned that the southern Balkan countries and the Caucasus are a “high-risk region” for more outbreaks.”The region is not only a prime resting ground for migratory bird species, but poultry production is mostly characterized by rural and household  husbandry with little in terms of biosecurity and strong regulatory inspection. In Romania it is still too early to say if the situation has stabilized,” said Juan Lubroth, head of the FAO’s Emergency Prevention System for Transboundary Animal Diseases, in a news release.The agency said H5N1 has been confirmed in 55 countries, up from 45 in April. But the virus’s spread among poultry has been slowed by efforts to improve surveillance, strengthen veterinary services, and, in some cases, vaccinate poultry, officials said.”More than 220 million birds have died from the virus or been killed in culling activities aimed at stopping the spread of the disease,” the FAO said.To fight avian flu, the agency said it has received US $67.5 million so far and has signed agreements with donors for another $29 million. An additional $25 million has been promised. The FAO has disbursed $32.5 million since donor countries at a conference in Beijing last January pledged $1.9 billion for the campaign to stop the virus.See also:Aug 21 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_08_21/en/index.htmlAug 21 FAO news releasehttp://www.fao.org/newsroom/en/news/2006/1000378/index.htmllast_img read more

Wolf Administration: New Grant Program is an Investment in Pennsylvania’s Dairy Industry, Farmers

first_img Economy,  Environment,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced the availability of $5 million in grant funding to help Pennsylvania dairy farmers overcome challenges and capitalize on new opportunities. This historic funding, made available for the first time under the Pennsylvania Dairy Investment Program, is the most recent of several initiatives from the Wolf Administration to support Pennsylvania’s dairy industry.“Today’s market has presented new challenges to dairy farmers that are requiring them to innovate and adapt in order to remain successful,” Governor Wolf said. “The new Pennsylvania Dairy Investment Program is a key tool that incentivizes the dairy industry to support the often costly and difficult process of modernizing or expanding their business model or operation. My administration is proud to continue to stand with our hard-working dairy farmers and their families.”The Pennsylvania Dairy Investment Program was established under Act 42 of 2018 and will provide $5 million in grants to eligible applicants for researching new technologies, products and best practices; marketing to new domestic and international markets and exploring new business opportunities to diversify their operation and revenue streams; transitioning to organic production methods; and incorporating or expanding value-added dairy production, such as cheese and yogurt products. The program is now open for applications after guidelines were approved at today’s Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) board meeting.“These grants will help enable Pennsylvania dairy producers to overcome existing challenges, diversify their businesses, and strengthen their operations to aggressively and effectively compete in an increasingly competitive market,” said Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding. “This historic funding is not only a critical investment in an industry grappling with difficult global market conditions, but a critical investment in our largest sector of production agriculture and the people whose livelihoods rely on it.”In August, Secretary Russell Redding unveiled the Wolf Administration’s Dairy Development Plan, designed to guide Pennsylvania’s dairy industry toward growth and development amid a challenging market that also offers tremendous opportunities for producers and processors.Other measures the administration has taken to support the dairy industry include kicking off the “Choose PA Dairy: Goodness that Matters” campaign to support Pennsylvania’s dairy industry by educating consumers on how to find and buy locally-produced milk, and why it matters to Pennsylvania’s economy and the health of its residents; launching a statewide study by some of the nation’s leading dairy economists in 2017 to evaluate opportunities and inhibitors to growth in the industry; petitioning the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board to use the full extent of their statutory and regulatory powers to provide relief to dairy farmers affected by the persistent low-price environment; working to attract new processors to Pennsylvania; and surveying county economic development organizations to create an inventory of sites suitable for a dairy processing operation.Also at today’s CFA meeting, the board approved four agriculture projects through the First Industries Program to provide assistance to farmers looking to expand their operations:• Troy and Lynette Gelsinger were approved for a $250,000, 15-year loan at a 2.75 percent rate with a 7-year reset through the Greater Berks Development Fund for the construction of a third 31,500-square-foot poultry house on their 154-acre farm in Heidelberg Township, Berks County. In February 2016, the Gelsingers were approved for a loan through the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority for the construction of two broiler houses on their farm. The success of that project led to this addition of a third broiler house. The total project cost is $500,000.• Frank Fisher Family Limited Partnership was approved for a $375,000, 15-year loan at a 2.75 percent rate with a 7-year reset through the Greater Berks Development Fund for the acquisition of 49.34 tillable acres of land located directly across from the Fisher’s home farm in Oley Township, Berks County. The farm’s primary crops are corn and soybean as well as other vegetables. The family operates a seasonal produce stand on the farm’s property where they sell their crops. The total project cost is $750,000.• Dean and Jennifer Adams were approved for a $400,000, 15-year loan at a 2.75 percent rate through the Greater Berks Development Fund for the acquisition of a 123.92-acre farm located in Windsor Township, Berks County. The property includes a two-story family dwelling, corn barn, bank barn, pole building, and 93 tillable acres. The Adamses currently operate a 550-acre crop farm and a 68-cow dairy herd. The total project cost is $800,000.• Epsucheolige and Curtis Hoffman were approved for a $400,000, 15-year loan at a 2.75 percent rate with a 7-year reset through EDC Finance Corporation for the acquisition of a 46.24-acre parcel of land located in Rapho Township, Lancaster County. The property is located directly across from the Hoffman’s existing dairy farm and consists of a single-family dwelling, two barns, a pole building, a 314,000-gallon slurry tank, and thirty-eight tillable acres. The total project cost is $986,253.More information about the Pennsylvania Dairy Investment Program can be found on the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) website. To stay up-to-date on all Pennsylvania economic development news, follow DCED on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, and be sure to sign up for the department’s monthly e-newsletter. September 18, 2018 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Wolf Administration: New Grant Program is an Investment in Pennsylvania’s Dairy Industry, Farmerslast_img read more

Big Four bank warns shock to unit prices will spill over to houses

first_imgA Big Four bank has expressed concern over “strong risks” in Brisbane’s concentrated new unit market, warning a major fall in prices will spill over to houses.ONE of Australia’s Big Four banks has warned that a shock to unit prices will spill over to houses — and Brisbane is in the crosshairs.ANZ has run the numbers on Brisbane’s unit oversupply and warned there were “strong risks” arising out of the concentration of unit supply in the inner city which could see any price shock spill over to the housing market. ANZ bank has warned that Brisbane was already seeing unit prices fall.In latest Economic Insight report, ANZ Research revealed analysis on the spillover effect of a 10 per cent drop in Brisbane unit prices on other parts of the market, concluding there would be a “direct negative impact” on local house prices that could last for over a year.It said such a shock would see a 4 per cent fall in Brisbane house prices three months after the shock, while a similar drop in Sydney and Melbourne would see much higher levels of price cuts.“A sharp drop in unit prices has a direct negative impact on local house prices in all three cities, with the negative effect lasting around four to five quarters,” ANZ Research said.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor7 hours agoThe Big Four bank said the “sheer number of apartments set to come to market over the next 18 to 24 months is raising fears of oversupply and the possibility of corresponding price falls.” “Indeed, Brisbane unit prices are already falling.”Nationally the backlog of work was sitting at 220,000 dwellings worth $35 billion, but it was the concentration of units in Brisbane’s inner city that raised the alarm. While a major unit price drop in Sydney would impact Brisbane, the same could not be said for the reverse, according to ANZ. Picture: Destination NSWANZ Research warned that while Sydney and Melbourne saw a wide geographic spread in apartment supply, Brisbane’s construction boom was “heavily focused” in the inner city.“The concentration of building in such a small geographical area is likely to raise the risk of oversupply emerging, in our view. At the same time, Queensland’s population growth sits around historical lows in the post-mining boom period, which exacerbates the risks in this market.”The Big Four bank said it was “potentially seeing the start of this development right now” with Brisbane unit prices sitting 2.1 per cent lower than a year ago. “On the other hand, Melbourne prices are still rising (3.2 per cent year on year), and units in Sydney are experiencing strong growth (15 per cent year on year).”“With the additions to supply set to keep coming in Brisbane, there is a strong risk that we will see this trend persist for some time.”The bank analysis found that while any price falls in Sydney would have repercussions for Brisbane and Melbourne, a price correction in Brisbane “has no spill-over effect on the other cities”.last_img read more