Appeal hearing against stay on Gazipur polls Wednesday

first_imgGazipur City CorporationThe Supreme Court (SC) is scheduled to hold hearing on the two appeal petitions on Wednesday challenging the High Court order staying the Gazipur City Corporation (GCC) election for three months, reports UNB.The full bench of the appellate division, led by chief justice Syed Mahmud Hossain, will hear on the appeal petitions filed by two mayoral candidates of ruling party Awami League (AL) and the opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP).Earlier in the day, Awami League mayoral candidate Zahangir Alam filed a petition with the Appellate Division bench of the Supreme Court challenging the High Court order staying the Gazipur City Corporation (GCC) election for three months.The chamber judge of the Appellate Division justice Hasan Foyez Siddique on Tuesday sent the petitions to the full-bench of the appellate division after hearing on the two petitions.Earlier on Monday, BNP mayoral candidate Hasan Uddin Sarkar filed a petition with the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court challenging the High Court order.However, no hearing on the petition was held with the chamber judge of the Appellate Division as no representative from the election commission was present at the court, said Sagir Hossain Leon, counsel of the BNP mayoral candidate.On Sunday, the HC stayed the Gazipur City Corporation election, which was scheduled to be held on 15 May, for three months.It also issued a rule asking the government to explain as to why the inclusion of six moujas of Dhaka district into GCC should not be declared illegal.The government on 16 January 2013 published a gazette incorporating six moujas of Shimulia union of Savar upazila (South Boroibari, Domna, Shibrampur, West Panishail, South Panishail and Domnag) under Gazipur City Corporation but according to law, GCC was formed with Gazipur and Tongi municipalities.ABM Azharul Islam Suruj, Shimulia union parishad chairman of Savar, filed the writ on Sunday morning challenging the legality of the gazette as the election commission announced the election schedule incorporating six moujas of Dhaka district, which is illegal.Chief election commissioner KM Nurul Huda announced the election schedule for Gazipur and Khulna city corporations on 31 March.last_img read more

22000 held in antinarcotic drive Minister

first_imgHome minister Asaduzzaman Khan. File photoAt least 22,000 people have been detained since 123 May launch of a nationwide anti-narcotic drive, said home minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal on Monday.Speaking at a press meet at the Secretariat, the minister also said that the authorities will continue the drive until the drug trade is brought under control, according to UNB.The press meet was arranged to announce the schedule of programmes marking the forthcoming International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking.Every year, 26 June is observed as the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking by the United Nations (UN) member countries. According to a resolution of UN General Assembly taken on December 1987, the day was fixed as an international day.Replying to reporters’ query on the number of deaths occurred during the ongoing anti-narcotic drive, the home minister said, “I cannot state the specific statistics of death in the moment but till now at least 22,000 were arrested.”Drive is against drugs and not aimed at killing anyone, claimed Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal in reference to the deaths triggered by ‘gunfights’ during the anti-narcotic drive.The minister also added, “It’s normal for the law enforcers to open fire to protect their own life from the weapons of the illegal drug traders”.Earlier in the day, an alleged drug trader was killed and another injured in what the law enforcement call a gunfight with police at Chowka in Shibganj upazila of Chapainawabganj.With the latest one, at least 120 people were killed in ‘gunfights’ with members of law enforcement agencies while 37 bodies of suspected drug traders were recovered after reported gun battles between rival groups during the countrywide anti-narcotic drives since 15 May.The extrajudicial killings have created a wave of strong criticism across the country, particularly after the publication of audio clip of the killing of Cox’s Bazar Awami League leader Akramul Haque.Akramul Haque, a ward councillor of Teknaf municipality and local Awami League leader was killed in what Rab claimed was a “gunfight” between the elite force and drug peddlers in Cox’s Bazar on 27 May.On Thursday, speaking at a press conference at Cox’s Bazar Press Club, Akramul’s wife Ayesha Begum alleged that her husband was murdered in cold blood. She also gave journalists four unverified audio clips of chilling conversations in support of her claim. In one of the clips, a female voice is heard continuously screaming over a mobile phone hearing gunshots during a phone call. Ayesha claimed that the female voice was hers and the gunshots were fired at her husband.last_img read more

Catholic bishops stop short of mandating lay involvement in abuse investigations

first_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Share This! News By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Jack Jenkins Jack Jenkins is a national reporter for RNS based in Washington, covering U.S. Catholics and the intersection of religion and politics.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Share This! Share This! Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Ethiopia tour for gay, lesbian travelers in jeopardy amid backlash from faith groups TagsBaltimore clergy sex abuse scandal homepage featured Pope Francis Roman Catholic bishops Top Story U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops USCCB,You may also likecenter_img Catholicism Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News • Photos of the Week By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,BALTIMORE (RNS) — The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has passed a slate of long-awaited measures designed to combat sex abuse and hold church leadership accountable for mishandling cases, including creating a national hotline operated by an outside group for reporting incidents of abuse or their cover-up.“I’m confident that the idea of doing (investigations) in-house is long gone,” said a cautiously upbeat Cardinal Joseph Tobin of New Jersey after the reforms passed Thursday morning (June 13) — informed by a recent papal document — at the bishops’ spring meeting.But the bishops stopped short of handing power to lay Catholics or abuse survivors in those investigations, sparking a debate that revolves around whether doing so would overstep guidelines outlined in a document issued by Pope Francis after a Vatican summit on abuse in February.Chicago Cardinal Blase Cupich and other clerics were able to insert language into the resolutions stating that metropolitan bishops — who would oversee the investigations of fellow bishops — “should” rely on qualified lay persons. The inclusion of lay people is also among a moral “commitment” the bishops adopted Thursday morning on how to deal with sexual misconduct.But the language fell short of requiring bishops to take lay input, an important distinction that left victims advocates saying stronger measures are needed.Other clerics, such as Bishop William Shawn McKnight of Jefferson City, Mo., made clear that they support lay involvement regardless.“I believe it should be mandatory that we involve laity in the investigation of any case of sexual abuse by a bishop — or corruption, cover-up, involving the same,” McKnight said during the second day of voting. “I believe we should do that because that is the Catholic thing to do.”He added: “Lay involvement should be mandatory to make darn sure that we bishops do not harm the church in the way bishops have harmed the church — especially what we have become aware of this past year.”McKnight pointed to a section of “Lumen gentium,” one of the main documents of the 1964 Second Vatican Council, which, McKnight said, outlines the “obligation of the laity to be involved in the most important matters facing the church.”“Who can deny this is not the most important matter now of our generation?” he said.When Tobin was asked about McKnight’s comments at a news conference later in the day, he argued the new resolutions established a system that de facto requires lay involvement, and he said a gathering of metropolitan bishops, meeting on Wednesday, all agreed they could not now conduct an investigation without qualified lay people.“The possibility of doing that without qualified lay people, I would say is next to impossible — it is impossible,” Tobin said.Robert Deeley, left, bishop of the Diocese of Portland, Maine, accompanied by Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, speaks during a news conference June 11, 2019, at the USCCB’s spring meetings in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)Bishop Robert Deeley of Portland, Maine, also insisted that lay involvement was already effectively baked into the process, saying, “I think that it’s already done.”But the resolutions are a far cry from proposals considered when the bishops last met in November, such as the suggestion of creating an independent nonprofit to oversee abuse cases — an idea shot down by Vatican officials who said it superseded the authority of the pope.The new reforms also did not impress advocates such as Becky Ianni, an abuse survivor and leader of the Washington, D.C., and Virginia chapters of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests.Saying this week’s measures “aren’t going to change anything,” Ianni argued that the systems created by the bishops are simply “setting up new policies where (the church) is going to investigate itself.”Encouraging metropolitan bishops to appoint lay people to help with investigations, she added, is not the same as an independent process.“Anytime they can handpick the lay person, then that’s not independence,” she said. “We would really like them to contact their local attorney general and get three to four suggestions for experts.”In the meantime, she said, SNAP will continue to rely on civil authorities rather than the church to take action.“We have 20 attorneys general that are doing investigations (into Catholic sex abuse). We’re going to put our emphasis on getting the other 30 states to do the same.”Kim Smolik, CEO of Leadership Roundtable, a group consisting mostly of influential Catholic laity devoted to promoting better management in the church, said in a news release that she hopes the provisions are just the beginning of a lengthy process of reform.“A new culture of leadership is necessary if we are to truly address the crises,” Smolik’s statement said. “It starts by acknowledging the leadership failures, looking at the root causes, providing new formation in seminaries and other educational institutions, setting up governance structures with checks, balances, etc.” Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Closing of American Hebrew Academy marks end of Jewish boarding school experiment Share This! Jack Jenkins jackmjenkinslast_img read more

Make Your Christmas Tree Last Past Holidays… Like Houston

first_imgCity of Houston leaders say mulching the tree is an appropriate way to end the holidays.Since 1991, 23 million pounds of trees have been recycled in Houston.“There is one more gift that we can make to our community which is save valuable landfill, air space,  mulch this material, bring it back into the cities, so that we can grow flowers and gardens and keep the city as beautiful as it has been,” Harry Hayes, director of Houston’s Solid Waste Management Department.The mulch is given to the company Living Earth Houston to be sold and some proceeds go to help fund the city’s recycling program.If you want to recycle your Christmas tree there are 24 locations across Houston. – / 5 X Listen center_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share 00:00 /00:54last_img read more

In The Mixx Fridays

first_imgGdale@afro.com@GregoryODale On any given Friday night, the U Street corridor is bustling with a rather unique blend of hipsters, young professionals and students from nearby universities.At Indulj Restaurant and Lounge, a small eatery nestled just steps away from the U Street Metro station, you can also catch Marlee in the Mixx, a local progressive band bringing down the house. The nine-piece collective has been performing their signature “In the Mixx Fridays” series since last year and has performed at a myriad of shows across the country and around the world since forming in 2011.Perched in Indulj’s front window, Marlee in the Mixx regularly performs fan favorites including their renditions of Kendrick Lamar’s “Don’t Kill My Vibe,” Beyonce’s “XO,” and J. Cole’s “Power Trip.” This has proved to be a hallmark year for the group. In addition to releasing their highly-anticipated EP 10,000 Hours in May, the band made an appearance at this year’s BET Awards and was featured on TV One’s “Black Music Lives” commercial series.Collectively, the group ranges in age from 20 to 23. They may be young, but many of its members have been performing in Go-go bands for years. Their sound, a unique blend of neo-soul, rock, hip hop, and jazz, has garnered an impressive following. The band’s first single, “Cloud 9” received over 20,000 views on YouTube since its release in 2013. “Our sound is fresh, fun and universal more than everything,” said Foots, the band’s drummer. “Even something simple as a cover sounds like the original, but we end up taking it somewhere crazy. We’re learning how to play on our sound more than anything.”With a list of burgeoning acts from the DMV coming into the national scope, Marlee in the Mixx says their aim is to provide the world with something unique. “It’s a lot of talent out there, but [I do think some of it] is misrepresenting us as a whole,” Marlee, the band’s lead singer said. “But there are more people up and coming to change that. We’re doing this ourselves. We’re just young people going all the way hard.”For more information on Marlee In The Mixx and ‘In The Mixx Fridays,’ visit: http://www.marleeinthemixx.com/last_img read more

Is DaaS the New Information Goldmine

first_img By Dyan MachanSuppose you could find all the socks you ever lost. Now suppose getting those socks back enabled you to earn a better living, or work faster and smarter. Wouldn’t you be willing to pay someone to locate those socks on a worldwide sock exchange? That’s the crux of a business category that some entrepreneurs and investors find pregnant with opportunity. “We think this is the next hot thing,” says Jeanne Sullivan, an executive at StarVest Partners, a New York venture-capital firm developing a specialty in this area. The Information Edge “Data as a Service:”Businesses in this field gather specialized information, then organize it in a database for which users pay for access.The Price of Technology:Gathering the information isn’t expensive, but organizing and storing it can be; start-ups can spend millions on computer servers and a web presence.Shoestring Staff:Once it’s up and running, a firm can grow without much person power; five or six people can run a nationwide business. Related Links Small Business Success: Luck or Pluck? Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Seeking Alpha–and Users: 6 New Financial Web Sites More From smSmallBiz » December 30, 2009center_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Unfortunately, the business world has given this baby a jargony name: Data as a Service, or its diminutive, DaaS. It rhymes with SaaS, its better-known cousin that stands for Software as a Service. SaaS is the catchall name for on-demand software applications like those on an iPhone. DaaS, in contrast, recognizes that software is becoming a commodity; it’s data mixed with software that’s king.DaaS offers some intriguing possibilities for start-up types–a chance to build a lucrative business that can grow rapidly without needing a big workforce to keep it running. Better still, if you’re the first to build that sock database, you can have a near monopoly. So while start-up costs can be high–think anywhere up to $10 million to set up servers and a slick web presence–profit margins tend to be fat. That’s because the business model involves gathering information that’s relatively inexpensive or even free to the collector, analyzing it and slicing it into easy-to-consume pieces for people who will pay for it again and again. In business-school speak, “it’s monetizing rich data,” says Sullivan. Imagine, for example, being able to search the sock exchange to find socks that match a user’s singleton socks exactly and then to find the buyers nearest to the user who are willing to meet his price.Some established businesses, like the Zagat Survey restaurant guides, already roughly fit the category–Zagat gets consumers to fill out restaurant surveys and organizes them into guides that grow stale and need replacing, like last year’s fashions. Much more DaaS-like, and one-upping them considerably, is OpenTable. The company sells restaurant-reservation software to restaurants and offers diners online reservations and the ability to search restaurants by geography, cuisine and price; its recent IPO was seen as one of the brighter moments in the postcrash economy. The datacentric companies are among the fastest-growing these days, according to Louise Garnett, an analyst with information research firm Outsell: “I see two to three new ones each week.” Where 1990s-style web businesses often kept the technical and content elements separate, she notes, the growth today comes from companies that can integrate the two. Overall, the information industry grows 5 to 10 percent a year, according to Outsell.Making LemonadeWhat do all these ventures have in common? Lemons. George Akerlof’s lemons, to be precise. In the late 1960s the Nobel Prize-winning University of California, Berkeley, economist sought to answer the age-old question of why buying used cars favored the seller over the buyer. The buyer couldn’t know whether the seller was selling because he needed the cash, or because the junker had unseen repair and maintenance issues. Akerlof proved that the buyer’s inability to discern the difference between a good car and a lemon drove down the prices of all used cars. Buyers don’t like uncertainty, so many would simply walk away from the transaction. Fewer buyers means lower prices–hence the canyon-like price differential between new cars versus those driven even slightly. (And here we thought consumers were willing to pay thousands more for that fresh-car smell.) In financial markets, investors unable to distinguish between a great business and a loser will put their money into cash and leave start-ups without funding. Under Akerlof’s logic, providing more information, with a level playing field for buyer and seller, creates business opportunity.Darwin Melnyk, 45, a former Emory University seminary student, has been striving to do just that. He first entered this field as a modern-day Indiana Jones, working as a technology specialist on archeological digs in the Jordanian desert. In the field, Melnyk figured out how scientists, by inputting data on their laptops, could improve their productivity and speed up the fossilized process of garnering grants. Beginning in 2006 he started to apply those same skills to a different kind of artifact, digging up data about old tractors for farm-equipment dealers. Iron Solutions, of Fenton, Mo., had its genesis in an annually issued guide, akin to the used-car Blue Book, that dates back to the ’40s; dealers would dog-ear the guide to help them price, say, a rusted-out 1992 combine some farmer was offering on a trade. Some of the guide’s information was available online by 1999, but Iron Solutions hadn’t made the digital leap of making it easy to use.Enter Melnyk, who built the old tractor data into a sophisticated database. Want the autumn-harvest price on a tricked-out 2003 Flail chopper? No problem, for an equipment dealer with a $400-a-year subscription to IronSolutions.com. Farmers can search internationally for their machines, dealers can learn which farmers are interested in upgrading, and both can get much more specific equipment information that helps them make money-saving decisions. Melnyk says the business is growing 20 percent this year despite the economic climate–or perhaps because of it. “The good deal is more important than ever,” he says.High-Tech Coupon ClippingThe seeds of a similar business, MyGroceryDeals.com, were those colorful advertising inserts that irritatingly flutter out from Sunday papers. It wasn’t an obscure IT term like DaaS that was on Paul Davis’s mind when he spread out the fliers on his kitchen table in 2004. It was how he would pay for his future roast beef sandwiches by inputting all the specials on the web. Davis, who had previously founded an in-store survey business, wanted to consolidate the constantly changing weekly specials from grocery stores and deliver them online so consumers could compare prices on Coke, Huggies or whatever else they bought. He also enabled the bargain-crazed to use the site to “pantry load” by finding the best local deals regardless of product Z.”If I had known how hard it would be, I’m not sure I would have done this,” sighs Davis, in an oft-heard entrepreneur’s lament. There were minor hitches, as one can imagine, in getting 160,000 ads per month organized for shoppers in 55,000 zip codes across the U.S. At one point, his computer server started choking on too many ads, slowing to “a chug, chug, chug,” says Davis, who had to spend an unexpected $500,000 to get his systems up to consumer-friendly speed again. “Often on Thursday we’d have no idea how we were going to make payroll on Friday.” But four years later, with 300,000 registered shoppers, Davis says MyGroceryDeals.com is close to breaking even on revenue from advertisers and coupon manufacturers. He is also launching a premium membership service and will start selling research from surveying his customers, his old specialty.Despite its growth, the site is still more or less a small business; MyGroceryDeals.com gets by with only five full-time employees. Davis doesn’t have to spend much to gather information since grocery chains now digitally feed their ads to MyGroceryDeals.com for free. If and when profit arrives, the number of people getting a piece of it will be relatively small–meaning, presumably, more data dollars for Davis. 7 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

STOBART Super League action returns to Langtree Pa

first_imgSTOBART Super League action returns to Langtree Park next Friday as Saints take on London Broncos (Aug 31).Kicking off at 8pm Mike Rush’s men will be looking to record back to back wins and continue that form into the playoffs.The action gets underway when the Under 20s take on their counterparts at 5.45pm before the main event.And tickets for the East Stand are just a fiver for juniors.Tickets are on sale now from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, by calling 01744 455 052 or by logging on here.You can also use the Cash Turnstiles on the night in the North (unallocated) and East Stands.last_img