Facebook bans 12 dangerous British farright groups and individuals

first_imgSome far-right groups in the UK are now outlawed on Facebook. Photofusion/Ian Francis/UIG via Getty Images Facebook banned a handful of prominent British far-right groups on Thursday, as part of the implementation of its “dangerous organizations and individuals” policy.In total 12 people and groups were outlawed by the social network, including the British National Party (BNP) and its president Nick Griffin, Britain First, the English Defence League, Knights Templar International and the National Front. Co-founder of the English Defence League Tommy Robinson is already banned under the same policy.”Individuals and organizations who spread hate, or attack or call for the exclusion of others on the basis of who they are, have no place on Facebook,” said a spokeswoman for the company in a statement. “Our work against organised hate is ongoing and we will continue to review individuals, organizations, pages, groups and content against our Community Standards.”The ban applies not only to the individuals and groups, but to posts and other content that express praise or support for them.Its introduction follows criticisms made as part of a Channel 4 documentary last year that said Facebook wasn’t doing enough to stem the flow of far-right hate on the platform. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube have all come under pressure in the UK, the US and elsewhere to prevent the spread of hate speech. But they’ve had to simultaneously work out how to balance banning groups and individuals with free speech concerns. Internet Services Share your voice Comments 3 Tags Facebooklast_img read more

Who is Norm Self The 85yearold retired clergymanturnedporn star

first_imgNorm SelfYoutube screengrabNorm Self, a priest from North Dakota, appeared in his first adult film at the ripe age of 85. The retired clergyman exchanged his crucifix for life in adult films and has no regrets as of yet. He made three more adult films in the past two years.Self joined the clergy at the age of 18 and after 28 years of marriage, he realised that he was gay.It all began in 1997 when Self was working as a campus minister and came across a group of gay men. It was then Self realised that he was gay, he told The Sun.Self’s first introduction to adult film happened when his housemates invited him to be part of one. He said, “My housemate asked me if I’d be in a film. I was invited in and all of a sudden all this attention comes to me. We are going to have sex anyway so why not make it a liberating and bonding experience instead of hiding it away in the shadows?”Describing his first experience, Self told HuffPost in 2018 that it was delightful. He said that his body was a temple where intimacy and ecstasy intermingled and was open to making more adult films.”It was splendid! How could it not be? (I was in) a blessed rural setting, surrounded by a cast and crew of loving, competent, supportive brothers intent on sharing the good news of the healing power of pleasure. What could be more delightful? And if you’ve seen the video, with the two adorable models “performing, what else could be lacking?” Self was quoted as saying by HuffPost.last_img read more

22000 held in antinarcotic drive Minister

first_imgHome minister Asaduzzaman Khan. File photoAt least 22,000 people have been detained since 123 May launch of a nationwide anti-narcotic drive, said home minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal on Monday.Speaking at a press meet at the Secretariat, the minister also said that the authorities will continue the drive until the drug trade is brought under control, according to UNB.The press meet was arranged to announce the schedule of programmes marking the forthcoming International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking.Every year, 26 June is observed as the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking by the United Nations (UN) member countries. According to a resolution of UN General Assembly taken on December 1987, the day was fixed as an international day.Replying to reporters’ query on the number of deaths occurred during the ongoing anti-narcotic drive, the home minister said, “I cannot state the specific statistics of death in the moment but till now at least 22,000 were arrested.”Drive is against drugs and not aimed at killing anyone, claimed Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal in reference to the deaths triggered by ‘gunfights’ during the anti-narcotic drive.The minister also added, “It’s normal for the law enforcers to open fire to protect their own life from the weapons of the illegal drug traders”.Earlier in the day, an alleged drug trader was killed and another injured in what the law enforcement call a gunfight with police at Chowka in Shibganj upazila of Chapainawabganj.With the latest one, at least 120 people were killed in ‘gunfights’ with members of law enforcement agencies while 37 bodies of suspected drug traders were recovered after reported gun battles between rival groups during the countrywide anti-narcotic drives since 15 May.The extrajudicial killings have created a wave of strong criticism across the country, particularly after the publication of audio clip of the killing of Cox’s Bazar Awami League leader Akramul Haque.Akramul Haque, a ward councillor of Teknaf municipality and local Awami League leader was killed in what Rab claimed was a “gunfight” between the elite force and drug peddlers in Cox’s Bazar on 27 May.On Thursday, speaking at a press conference at Cox’s Bazar Press Club, Akramul’s wife Ayesha Begum alleged that her husband was murdered in cold blood. She also gave journalists four unverified audio clips of chilling conversations in support of her claim. In one of the clips, a female voice is heard continuously screaming over a mobile phone hearing gunshots during a phone call. Ayesha claimed that the female voice was hers and the gunshots were fired at her husband.last_img read more

Trump Considers Pardon for Ali Wants Athletes Advice

first_imgBy JILL COLVIN, Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — Reveling in his pardon powers, President Donald Trump said Friday he’s thinking “very seriously” about pardoning former heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali, whose conviction was already overturned by the Supreme Court in 1971.It’s one of “thousands” of cases the president’s team is reviewing, he told reporters as he left the White House en route to a world leaders’ summit in Canada. And Trump said he’s thinking about soliciting recommendations about other cases to consider from pro football players and other athletes who have protested racial injustice by kneeling during the national anthem — a tactic Trump has fiercely denounced.In this Nov. 2009 file photo, President Bush presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to boxer Muhammad Ali in the East Room of the White House. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)Trump said that, “instead of talk,” he’s “going to ask all of those people to recommend to me — because that’s what they’re protesting — people that they think were unfairly treated by the justice system.”“I’m going to ask them to recommend to me people that were unfairly treated, friends of theirs or people that they know about and I’m going to take a look at those applications,” he said.Trump has been on a clemency kick of late, using his near-limitless power to pardon a growing list that includes a former White House aide, a conservative commentator and a former sheriff convicted of violating a judge’s orders who campaigned with Trump in 2016.Earlier this week, he commuted the life sentence of a woman whose cause was championed by reality television star Kim Kardashian West. Last month he granted a posthumous pardon to boxing’s first Black heavyweight champion, Jack Johnson. Actor Sylvester Stallone alerted him to that case.Trump told reporters Friday his team is now “looking at literally thousands” of people who have come to their attention because they’ve been treated unfairly or their sentences are too long.“We have 3,000 names. We’re looking at them,” Trump said, calling the power to pardon “a beautiful thing.”Among them is Ali, who died in 2016.Born Cassius Clay, Ali changed his name after converting to Islam in the 1960s. He refused to serve in the Vietnam War because of his religious beliefs, declaring himself a conscientious objector. He was stripped of his heavyweight crown in 1967, but his legal fight ended in 1971 when the Supreme Court ruled in his favor and overturned his conviction. He regained the boxing title in 1974.“I’m thinking about somebody that you all know very well. And he went through a lot. And he wasn’t very popular then,” Trump said. “He certainly, his memory is very popular now.”Ron Tweel, Ali’s lawyer, pointed out that Ali has no criminal record.“We appreciate President Trump’s sentiment, but a pardon is unnecessary,” he said.The White House did not immediately respond to questions about why the president feels one is needed.Trump said last week also said he’s considering commuting the sentence of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, who is serving 14 years in prison for corruption, and pardoning celebrity lifestyle guru Martha Stewart, who served about five months on charges connected to an insider trading case. O.J. Simpson, he said in response to a reporter’s question, is not on his list.The president has been operating outside the usual Justice Department clemency protocol, in which submitted cases are carefully considered based on their merits, and recommendations made. Instead, White House officials say, Trump has focused on individual cases that have caught his attention or been brought to him by friends or celebrities. He’s been especially drawn to cases in which he feels a person’s prosecution has been politically motivated — a situation that may remind him of his own predicament at the center of the special counsel investigation into Russian election meddling.Trump insisted Friday that he was also interested in clemency for regular people and those without high-profile backers.He said that, “it’s easier and people find it fascinating” to see him pardon the famous, but that he “would get more thrill out of pardoning people that nobody knows.”Yet Trump’s suggestion that professional athletes help him identify cases only seemed to fuel concerns that those without star advocates will be ignored.“Well, you know, if you think about it, that’s really — that becomes celebrity advocates. But they know a lot of things that we’re not going to know. They’ve seen a lot of abuse and they’ve seen a lot of unfairness,” he said.The idea also sparked backlash from the American Civil Liberties Union.“President Trump has spent much of his first 18 months in office degrading NFL players who protest police brutality and racial injustice. Today, he has tried once again to change the narrative about the work of those and other activists, betraying a fundamental misunderstanding of the cause behind these protests — and using racist dog whistles to do it,” said Jeff Robinson, the group’s deputy legal director.The players have been protesting racial injustice and the high numbers of African Americans killed by police.__Follow Colvin on Twitter at https://twitter.com/colvinjlast_img read more